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Legislation making its way through Congress aims to reaffirm that tribal epidemiology centers should have access to state and federal health data. Tribal leaders have had trouble accessing information to help fight COVID-19 and other diseases in places like the Navajo Nation, where this sign stands.

A measure passed by the U.S. House aims to remove barriers that Native Americans face in accessing public health data – something advocates say is key to providing a clearer picture of how COVID-19 and other diseases are disproportionately affecting tribes. Read more»

Hopi Chairman Timothy Nuvangyaoma said it is 'critical' that lawmakers reauthorize the Special Diabetes Program for Indians, which serves tribes across Arizona and the nation.

Hopi Chairman Timothy Nuvangyaoma said it is “critical” that lawmakers reauthorize the Special Diabetes Program for Indians, which serves tribes across Arizona and the nation. Read more»

Protesters bring the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women to a rally during President Donald Trump’s visit to Phoenix in February. Advocates who have been raising the issue for years are cautiously optimistic about new federal legislation.

Native American advocates and victim’s families have worked for years to draw attention to Indian Country’s epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women. Read more»

Paulson Chaco, director of the Navajo Nation Division of Transportation, testified that many federal grants treat tribes like second-class citizens because they force tribal governments to partner with states.

The Navajo Nation’s top transportation official complained to Congress on Thursday that his tribe’s members are treated as “second-class citizens” when the government allocates road funds. Read more»