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Report says drought may be worst in 1,200 years, little relief in sight

The megadrought that’s gripped Arizona and the Southwest since 2000 is the driest in more than 1,200 years, and it is likely to continue for the near future, and historic low water levels at Lake Mead and Lake Powell have triggered the state’s drought contingency plan.... Read more»

Harris tours Lake Mead, touts Biden agenda on infrastructure, climate change

Vice President Kamala Harris took a short tour Monday of Lake Mead - which has reached historic low water levels thanks to relentless drought and rising temperatures - and used the opportunity to pitch the Biden administration’s infrastructure and climate plans.... Read more»

Rapid growth in Arizona’s suburbs bets against uncertain water supply

Hundreds of thousands of people have moved to the Phoenix area in recent years looking for affordable homes and sunshine, and home sales have increased by nearly 12 percent in 2020 due to the pandemic, but there's just one problem: The region doesn’t appear to have enough water for all the growth.... Read more»

San Pedro River, squeezed by growing population, is subject of 2 lawsuits

The San Pedro rivers is the subject of lawsuits filed by the Center for Biological Diversity, the Sierra Club and other conservation groups. Cronkite News looks at the health of the San Pedro, one of the few undammed rivers in the Southwest.... Read more»

Arizona lawmakers agree on crucial drought contingency plan

Arizona lawmakers beat a midnight deadline set by the federal government by just a few hours Thursday, agreeing on a plan to balance drought and water supplies in the Colorado River Basin.... Read more»

Trump plan to boost Western water by easing rules worries advocates

Trump's plan to streamline regulations on new water projects is too simple, too vague or a worthwhile move to ease burdens, depending on the source. ... Read more»

Cost of drought: Less water from Lake Mead in 2020, higher rates

Lake Mead's dropping levels mean Arizona could lose its water allotment for the Central Arizona Project, which could lead to higher rates, and even restrictions. Conservation may be key to keeping water in everyone’s taps across the state.... Read more»