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U.S. Rep. Ruben Gallego has jumped into the U.S. Senate race. For the moment, his prospects are a lot better than independent incumbent Kyrsten Sinema's.

U.S. Rep. Ruben Gallego is a former Marine Corps combat officer and it shows, as he guns the engine on his U.S. Senate campaign. He is reading the terrain well, surrounding himself with good commanders and has just seized the high ground. Read more»

Mark Finchem on Aug. 2, 2022, at an election night party for Kari Lake.

A lawsuit filed by Mark Finchem last week seeking to overturn his election loss in the secretary of state race will move forward without failed Republican congressional candidate Jeff Zink after an amended complaint was filed this week. Read more»

U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema is no longer a Democrat. She was just passing through the party, anyway. (Sinema speaks during a 
Finance Committee hearing, Oct. 19, 2021)

News flash: U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema pulls an attention-seeking move to make herself so much more super-important. Or not. And my hot take: Eyeroll. Of course she did. Read more»

U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema announced Friday that she was leaving the Democratic Party to become an independent. Here, she arrives at a Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee confirmation hearing on Feb. 1, 2022 in Washington D.C.

Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema announced Friday morning that she was leaving the Democratic Party, a move that was not surprising to political observers and longtime former allies and foes of the senior senator who are now looking ahead to 2024.  Read more»

It’s unclear whether Sinema will run for re-election in 2024, but her status as an independent could throw such a contest into chaos.

Kyrsten Sinema, Arizona’s senior U.S. senator, has left the Democratic Party and re-registered as an independent - a move that has immediate political implications for Democrats, who this week won a 51-seat majority in the Senate. Read more»

From left: Democratic Reps.-elect Robert Garcia, Marie Gluesenkamp Perez, Greg Casar, Gabe Vasquez, Andrea Salinas, Maxwell Alejandro Frost, Yadira Caraveo, Delia Ramirez, Rob Menendez.

The campaign arm of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus welcomed the highest number of Democratic Latino lawmakers elected to Congress - even as several Republican Latinos also were elected to Congress, and many of those soon-to-be lawmakers have already made history. Read more»

Former President Barack Obama speaking at a Nov. 2, 2022, campaign rally in Phoenix.

With former President Barack Obama in Arizona to campaign with them, Democratic candidates running for office tried to strike a more hopeful tone at a campaign rally with only six days to go before Election Day. Read more»

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., during her speech Monday at the McConnell Center, where she repeated her insistence that bipartisanship is the only way to win lasting legislation in the Senate.

Arizona Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema has been criticized for defending the filibuster before, but that did not stop her from repeating her position, stating that defending the filibuster may be “an unpopular opinion,” but that it’s needed to make the Senate work in a bipartisan manner. Read more»

Under tribes’ nation-to-nation arrangements with the federal government, states did not have the authority to prosecute alleged crimes on tribal lands.

U.S. lawmakers re-introduced legislation to provide more resources for tribal law enforcement, an issue they say has become more urgent as Congress considers how to respond to a case that complicated criminal jurisdiction. Read more»

A member of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Police Department on hand for the 2010 signing of the Tribal Law and Order Act. The bill helped tribal police regain some of the authority they had lost in prior decades – authority that advocates say is being lost through the Supreme Court’s ruling in Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta.

Indigenous leaders called on Congress Tuesday to reverse a Supreme Court ruling that expands states’ ability to prosecute crimes on tribal land, a ruling they said threatens their sovereignty and their ability to protect their citizens. Read more»

GOP campaign sites routinely blame the country’s woes on President Biden “and his leftist allies,” with GOP Senate nominee Blake Masters’ website tagging Biden no fewer than 15 times - but the president is all but invisible on Democratic campaign websites. Read more»

The Central Arizona Project crosses a barren stretch of desert just north of Bouse, Ariz., after water from the Colorado River is diverted from Lake Havasu.

In June, Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Camille Touton told the U.S. Senate that states using the Colorado River Basin for their water supply have 60 days to create an emergency plan to cut their water usage by 2 to 4 million acre-feet. Read more»

Transportation projects were among the biggest requests by members of Arizona’s congressional delegation for fiscal 2023, the second year Congress has allowed 'community project funding' – or earmarks – after a 10-year hiatus. But requests covered the gamut, from military construction to medical equipment to counseling programs.

For a second straight year, Republicans refrained from requesting any local projects funding, while Democrats this year raised their requests by more than $194.5 million, a 43% increase over last year, when earmarks were restored after a decade-long hiatus. Read more»

More than 100 congressional Democrats are urging the White House to extend the pause on student loan repayment beyond the Aug. 31 deadline due to inflation and an ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Read more»

Hundreds protest for abortion rights in early May after a draft decision of the Supreme Court blocking abortion rights in the U.S. was leaked.

While many Arizona Republicans were celebrating Friday's Supreme Court decision, Arizona Democrats and abortion activists were quick to condemn the ruling overturning Roe v. Wade. Read more»

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