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State Sen. Raquel Terán, D-Phoenix, speaks with Dora Vasquez, the Executive Director of the Arizona Alliance for Retired Americans at a roundtable with community members about the Inflation Reduction Act in downtown Phoenix on Aug. 29, 2022. Deanna Mireau, 72, (left) and Joanne Romero, 74, (right) are listening in the foreground.

Retirees in Arizona struggle to divide monthly social security payments of $1,667 between rent, food and healthcare bills. Provisions in the recently passed Inflation Reduction Act seek to ease some of that budget strain by introducing caps on rapidly rising Medicare costs. Read more»

The problem with the ad’s $300 billion claim is it frames the spending decline as hurting older Americans insured under Medicare. That’s not so.

As Senate Democrats raced to pass what could be their final piece of major legislation before the midterm elections, critics went to the airwaves to falsely blast the proposal as hurting older Americans who rely on Medicare. Read more»

While pharmaceutical companies have argued against Medicare price negotiation, saying it would harm research and development of new drugs and innovation, polling has found strong public support.

A major spending bill from U.S. Senate Democrats would allow Medicare for the first time in its history to begin negotiating the prices of certain high-priced prescription drugs — a proposal that’s been around for years but has never come close to the finish line. Read more»

If federal courts allow state bans on mail-order abortion medications to take effect, legal experts predict the laws will be difficult to enforce without punishing the patient.

Receiving abortion medications through the mail after consulting with a physician is a gray area of the law that may take years of legal battles to resolve as it will be difficult to prove in courts that the FDA approval preempts state abortion bans, Read more»

More than a dozen major drug manufacturers have scaled back or halted their participation in a federal drug discount program for safety-net providers, which are supposed to pass on the savings to patients with low incomes.

Hospitals and community and rural health clinics that serve low-income patients say drug manufacturers have threatened their financial stability by abandoning a federal drug discount program that saves those health providers millions of dollars a year. Read more»

19 million Americans obtained likely counterfeit prescription medications through non-licensed internet pharmacies or while traveling - but while counterfeit medications may look legitimate, active ingredients are frequently replaced with dangerous alternatives. Read more»

Since Vaught’s arrest in 2019, there have been at least seven other incidents of hospital staffers searching medication cabinets with three or fewer letters and then administering or nearly administering the wrong drug.

Nurse RaDonda Vaught was prosecuted this year in an extremely rare criminal trial for a medical mistake, but the drug mix-up at the center of her case is anything but rare and the technological vulnerability that made the error possible still persists. Read more»

The U.S. House on Thursday passed a bill on a bipartisan 232-193 vote that would limit the price of insulin, as congressional Democrats met throughout the day with health care advocates to make their case for the proposal. Read more»

US President Joe Biden arrives to deliver the State of the Union address as U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris (L) and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) look on during a joint session of Congress in the U.S. Capitol House Chamber on March 1, 2022.

President Joe Biden used his first State of the Union address on Tuesday night to reassert America as a leading global voice for democracy and condemn Russian President Vladimir Putin for starting an “unprovoked” war in Ukraine. Read more»

When harm-reduction groups can’t order naloxone, the people they serve can die.

As overdose deaths nationwide reach all-time highs, increasing access to naloxone is a key part of the Biden administration's overdose prevention strategy - but advocates say the administration has not addressed their greatest barrier to obtaining the lifesaving medication. Read more»

A nurse administers a nasopharyngeal swab to test a patient for coronavirus.

Pfizer joins pharmaceutical giant Merck in seeking Food and Drug Administration approval for a COVID-fighting pill after clinical trials showed the pill prevented 89% of hospitalizations and deaths, and the the United States is primed to have millions of doses of the pill in hand. Read more»

Over the long term, the idea is to slow the overall inflation of drug prices, which has exceeded general inflation for decades.

The Medicare prescription drug pricing plan Democrats unveiled this week is not nearly as ambitious as many lawmakers sought, but they and drug policy experts say the provisions crack open the door to reforms that could have dramatic effects. Read more»

The Biden administration and Congress are embroiled in haggling over what priorities will make it into the spending bill, but for the pharmaceutical industry there is one agenda: Heading off Medicare drug price negotiation, which it considers an threat to its business model. Read more»

Pharmaceutical companies have spent a lot of money on messaging. PhRMA, the industry's trade group, launched a seven-figure ad campaign against legislation to lower drug prices through negotiation.

As Congress debates cutting prescription drug costs, a poll released Tuesday found the majority of adults — regardless of political party or age — support letting the federal government negotiate drug prices for Medicare beneficiaries and those in private health insurance plans. Read more»

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema asking a question during the Aviation and Space Subcommittee of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee hearing May 14, 2019.

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema formed a congressional caucus to raise “awareness of the benefits of personalized medicine” in February. Soon after that, employees of pharmaceutical companies donated $35,000 to her campaign committee. Read more»

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