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Why Moderna won’t share rights to COVID-19 vaccine with the government that paid for its development

A quiet monthslong legal fight between the U.S. National Institutes of Health and drugmaker Moderna over COVID-19 vaccine patents recently burst into public view, pointing to serious problems in the ways U.S. companies bring drugs and vaccines to market. ... Read more»

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Scientists search for cause of mysterious COVID-related inflammation in children

More than 5,200 of the 6.2 million U.S. children diagnosed with COVID have developed MIS-C, a rare but life-threatening complication of COVID-19, and pediatric intensive care units are now struggling to save the latest round of extremely sick children.... Read more»

FactCheck

Vaccine ingredient SM-102 is safe, despite claims in recent video

The COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna uses an ingredient called SM-102 to deliver the mRNA that carries instructions for how to develop antibodies against the novel coronavirus and a widely shared video is now spreading the falsehood that SM-102 is harmful, but the warning label it shows is for chloroform, not SM-102.... Read more»

Ask KHN-PolitiFact: How can COVID vaccines be safe when they were developed so fast?

The development of the first COVID vaccines may have seemed to occur at a dizzying pace. After all, scientists identified a new virus and created vaccines to protect against its most severe effects within a year. But the research underpinning these vaccines isn’t that new at all, vaccine experts say. Some of it is decades old. This foundation, combined with technical expertise, urgency and financial resources, enabled scientists to pull off the medical marvel.... Read more»

FactCheck

Pfizer CEO got vaccinated, contrary to claim in video

The chief executive officer for Pfizer, Albert Bourla, has gotten his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, he told Axios in early March. But a video posted to Facebook on March 24 is blaring the false claim: “Pfeizer CEO refuses [vaccine],” with an emoji that looks like the SARS-CoV-2 virus and a syringe. ... Read more»

Doctors urge elimination of vitamin D deficiencies to help fight COVID-19

A recent column by a group of doctors, including a former U.S. surgeon general, cites research indicating that COVID-19 patients with vitamin D deficiencies fared worse, including one study that found a deficiency in 97% of patients who wound up in intensive care, compared to a deficiency in just 33% of patients with asymptomatic COVID-19.... Read more»

How university students & faculty are joining the race in COVID PPE innovation

As the coronavirus has claimed more than 443,000 lives in the U.S. alone, the call for more personal protective equipment becomes greater. Now, universities and their students are imagining ways to not only improve public attitudes toward masks but also the technology behind them.... Read more»

FactCheck: Q&A on coronavirus vaccines

An overview of the vaccine development efforts underway and answer some questions about the testing process, the likelihood and timing of a vaccine in the U.S., and what to expect from a COVID-19 vaccine.... Read more»

Blood centers will collect plasma from COVID-19 survivors in hopes of treatment

Blood donation centers across the U.S. are ramping up efforts to collect plasma from people who have recovered from COVID-19 in hopes it could be used to save the lives of others infected with the pandemic disease.... Read more»

8 things to know about coronavirus, disinfectant wipes, and UA's 'Dr. Germ'

Microbiologist Charles Gerba and his colleagues at the University of Arizona scientists are turning their attention to the use of disinfectants to battle COVID-19, the deadly disease caused by the novel coronavirus.... Read more»

Analysis

No matter what some public officials say, the message you need to hear is 'stay home'

Mixed messaging from all levels of government is putting Americans at risk and will speed the spread of the coronavirus. No matter what politicians say, public health experts agree. Stay home, even if you feel fine.... Read more»

Cultural barriers challenge Native Americans seeking cancer treatment

Despite some strides in improving health care access and treatment in Indian Country, cultural barriers still prevent patients from asking for help or getting treatment.... Read more»

$4.8M grant to speed UA's work on Valley fever vaccine for dogs

Researchers at the University of Arizona say they’ve made progress in developing a vaccine that could protect dogs from Valley fever, a potentially deadly respiratory disease common in the Southwest.... Read more»

MIA in the war on cancer: Where are the low-cost treatments?

Michael Retsky awoke from surgery to bad news. The tumor in his colon had spread to four of his lymph nodes and penetrated the bowel wall. When Retsky showed the pathology report to William Hrushesky, his treating oncologist, the doctor exclaimed, "Mamma mia."... Read more»

Republicans say no to CDC gun violence research

After the Sandy Hook school shooting, Rep. Jack Kingston (R-GA) was one of a few congressional Republicans who expressed a willingness to reconsider the need for gun control laws. More than a year later, as Kingston competes in a crowded Republican primary race for a U.S. Senate seat, the congressman is no longer talking about common ground.... Read more»

DSM-5, controversial update to psych manual, released

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, known simply as the DSM-5, was released by the American Psychiatric Association this week amid criticism of the guide’s changes.... Read more»

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