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The Tucson City Council will hold public hearings on water, parks and trash fee increases.

Rate increases are in the works for Tucson residents, and the City Council will hold a public hearing ahead of proposed higher costs to living in the city, plus more in local government meetings this week. Read more»

City Manager Mike Ortega talking about a rental assistance program in August 2021.

Tucson City Manager Mike Ortega will make $300,000 a year with his base salary after the City Council voted last Tuesday at a regular meeting to give the seven-year top administator a raise and renew his contract for another two years. Read more»

Tucson City Manager Mike Ortega stands to get a $75,000 per-year raise after seven years on the job.

The Tucson City Council is set to vote Tuesday on paying City Manager Mike Ortega $300,000 per year, but the they're being needlessly shifty about it. Plus a plethora of other local government meetings this week. Read more»

The initial round of broad recommendations from the Regional Transportation Authority's technical team will go before the City Council. 'RTA Next' talks are about to get hot.

Tucson City Manager Mike Ortega is recommending the council in 2023 resume taking every bloody pint of Central Arizona Project water its freaking entitled to get, as the feds reduce Arizona's allotment. Read more»

Tucson City Manager Mike Ortega offers council Phase II of his budget, which includes 206 new hires.

Tucson City Manager Mike Ortega will ask the City Council to spend $82 million filling out the 2022-23 budget. Local school districts are looking to spend federal coronavirus relief dollars on heating, cooling, shots and new teachers. Read more»

Tucson police are sending the issue of a pay hike to arbitration with the city, while local firefighters are set to get a 3 percent raise after August, as the City Council pushed back on officers demands for a greater increase in salaries. Read more»

New Tucson Water Director John Kmiec.

Tucson City Manager Mike Ortega has promoted John Kmiec from interim to permanent director of Tucson Water. Read more»

The Tucson City Council will get a first look at a proposed Fiscal Year 2022-23 budget, with a huge surplus.

Tucson's $158 million "fund balance" creates opportunities for the City Council to spend on transportation and public safety priorities. Plus, more in our quick look at what's planned for local government meetings this week. Read more»

Samuel Credio will lead Tucson's Department of Transportation and Mobility

UA grad Samuel Credio was picked serve as the director of Tucson's Department of Transportation and Mobility following a national selection process. Read more»

Anna Rosenberry

The city of Tucson hired Anna Rosenberry as the new chief finance officer and assistant city manager. Rosenberry started March 21 and comes from Montana, where she had more than two decades of experience in local government finance. Read more»

City Hall

The city of Tucson is moving ahead with their plans to create a Labor Standards Unit under the control of their Business Services Department. Advocates for Prop. 206, the $15 minimum wage ballot initiative, have said the policy requires a department to enfroce labor law and that this new unit may not cut it. Read more»

A design of the housing project at Menlo Park

The Tucson City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to include for-profit developers in impact fee subsidies with the aim of quickly creating more affordable housing. This will reduce costs for projects planned in Menlo Park and Dunbar Spring. Read more»

City Hall

The Tucson City Council will return to in-person meetings on April 5 as the number of new local COVID cases drops. Pima County, TUSD and the UA are also rolling back COVID policies such as mask mandates. Read more»

A map of an infill zone where growth will be encouraged to build up, so Tucson doesn't sprawl outward.

Homelessness, economic development, infill and maybe censorship are on tap for this week's meetings of local elected officials. Read more»

The Tucson City Council unanimously voted in favor of sticking with the Regional Transportation Authority after threatening to leave without changes to its structure, and also approved asking city voters to extend a sales tax that fund street improvements alongside the RTA. Read more»

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