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U.S. testing capacity continues to be plagued by a host of problems, including supply-chain bottlenecks, staffing shortages, intermittent spikes in demand and results that can take hours — or far longer.

The U.S. could soon have access to a new antiviral pill expected to alter the deadly trajectory of the COVID-19 pandemic - but experts say the success of the treatments would hinge on whether high-risk infected patients will be able to get tested fast enough to make a difference. Read more»

A nurse administers a nasopharyngeal swab to test a patient for coronavirus.

Pfizer joins pharmaceutical giant Merck in seeking Food and Drug Administration approval for a COVID-fighting pill after clinical trials showed the pill prevented 89% of hospitalizations and deaths, and the the United States is primed to have millions of doses of the pill in hand. Read more»

Una familia de Seattle, Washington juega un papel en el desarrollo de unas pastillas diarias que pueden combatir los síntomas de COVID temprano después de una diagnóstico positivo y también limitar la transmisión del virus. Read more»

If the antiviral pills prove effective, the next challenge will be ramping up a distribution system that can rush them to people as soon as they test positive.

Clinical trials are underway at the Fred Hutch cancer research center that’s part of an international effort to test an antiviral treatment that could halt COVID early in its course. Read more»

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema asking a question during the Aviation and Space Subcommittee of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee hearing May 14, 2019.

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema formed a congressional caucus to raise “awareness of the benefits of personalized medicine” in February. Soon after that, employees of pharmaceutical companies donated $35,000 to her campaign committee. Read more»

The U.S. Supreme Court’s Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission ruling in 2010 did not, as some warned, unleash a flood of corporate money directly into elections. Read more»

Several of the nation's largest pharmaceutical companies said they plan to tighten screening of physicians who promote their drugs after ProPublica reported last month that more than 250 of them had been sanctioned for misconduct. Read more»

Any gifts from the medical industry to doctors will be available in a federal database.

Doctors who accept speaking fees, five-star meals and other compensation from pharmaceutical or medical device companies will soon see their names – and the value of the gifts they accept – revealed on the Web, under a new federal law that follows several states in drawing attention to such financial benefits. Read more»