Special thanks
to our supporters

  • NewsMatch
  • Ernie Pyle
  • Rocco's Little Chicago
  • Humberto Lopez — HSLopez Family Foundation
  • Google News Initiative
  • Lara Rubio
  • Marsha & David Irwin
  • Robert Jacobson
  • Stephen Martinek
  • Daniel Sorenson
  • Theresa Grant
  • & many more!

We rely on readers like you. Join them & contribute to the Sentinel today!

Hosting provider

Proud member of

Local Independent Online News Publishers Authentically Local Local First Arizona Institute for Nonprofit News
 1 2 >
Secretary of State John Kerry reacts Tuesday in Vienna, Austria, after the close of negotiations on a multi-national deal aimed at reining in Iranian nuclear capabilities. Leonhard Foeger/Reuters

It took more than 20 months of negotiations to reach agreement on an Iranian nuclear deal, but it took mere hours for Arizona lawmakers to respond to the plan, with support falling along party lines. Read more»

Secretary of State John Kerry and Sen. Tom Cotton each claimed the other distorted the facts regarding the role of Congress in a possible international deal on Iran’s nuclear program: Read more»

Canadians are reeling after attacks last week that left two soldiers dead: one run down by a car near Montreal, one shot while standing guard at the National War Memorial in Ottawa. It didn’t take long for questions to arise about if and how such attacks could be prevented. Why would terrorists (or anybody) want to attack Canada? Is the United States at risk from Canadian terrorists? Read more»

The White House spent much of last week trying to figure out if the word "war" was the right one to describe its military actions against the Islamic State. So how many wars is the U.S. fighting right now? Somewhere between zero and 134. Read more»

The United States is grappling with the risk level of the extremist militants retaliating as Obama inserts military might into Iraq. Read more»

Analysis: Everybody was expecting a major foreign policy revamp. But the president broke no new ground and struck a defensive pose in his West Point address. Read more»

Soldiers ride on a street in Miguel Aleman, a city in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, in 2010.

As Mexico plans to deploy federal forces to a border state to quell a rash of violence there, U.S. Rep. Filemon Vela says a U.S. endorsement will help the strategy succeed. But analysts have some serious concerns about the strategy. Vela says there's no perfect solution but that the status quo cannot stand. Read more»

A U.S. Army Soldier conducts a patrol with a platoon of Afghan national army soldiers to check on conditions in the village of Yawez, Wardak province, Afghanistan, Feb. 17, 2010.

As the clock ticks down to the promised withdrawal from Afghanistan, the U.S. military is trying to figure out how to market the idea that the international intervention has actually accomplished its core mission — bringing peace and stability to a nation that has known little of either for the past 35 years. The solution: a little Newspeak. Read more»

Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei

As US President Barack Obama made abundantly clear in his end-of-year press conference — his body language even more eloquently than his actual language — it's a good year to see the end of. It was a year that most inhabitants of the Middle East are surely glad to see end, though 2014 isn't likely to turn out any better for most of them. Read more»

It’s been quite a year for U.S. foreign policy, with plenty of undertakings both naughty and nice. Read more»

Rep. Trent Franks, R-Glendale, called the multi-nation agreement to ease sanctions against Iran in exchange for a six-month halt on its nuclear development program 'the very definition of a bad deal.'

Several Arizona lawmakers have weighed in on the Obama administration’s weekend announcement of an agreement intended to limit Iran’s nuclear program – and most are not pleased. Read more»

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

Secretary of State John Kerry recently revised the historical record to say both he and Chuck Hagel, now the secretary of defense, “opposed the president’s decision to go into Iraq” as senators. Both voted to give President Bush the authority to use military force in Iraq. Read more»

Arizona Sens. John McCain, left, and Jeff Flake speak during the Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting at which senators gave preliminary approval to a resolution allowing the president to take military action against Syria.

Both of Arizona’s senators voted Wednesday to authorize military strikes against the Syrian government for its reported use of chemical weapons against civilians and opposition forces in that country’s civil war. Read more»

"The purpose of military action in Syria should not be to help the president save face. It should not be merely cosmetic. Instead, the goal of military action should be to shift the balance of power on the battlefield against Assad and his forces." Read more»

It's all but official: The United States and its allies have accepted that the Syrian government used chemical weapons against its own people and they are prepared to respond. The big question now is how? And, even more important, to what end? Read more»

 1 2 >