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Just how much of the oil spilled in the Gulf is still there? Depends on what the meaning of "is" is. NOAA is hedging some of its estimates, and not in a good way. About three-quarters of the oil that spilled into the Gulf from BP’s ruptured well is still in the environment. Read more»

An oil spill notice on Pensacola Beach, Florida, July 9.

A decade-old environmental assessment by offshore drilling regulators called for more research on Corexit dispersant, warned that deepwater spills were difficult to stop, and cautioned that such spills could "permanently cover water bottoms and wetlands." Read more»

BP appears to be delaying decisions about the validity of many claims for damages from the Gulf oil spill, leaving claimants frustrated by bureaucratic obstacles and confusing requests for more documentation. Read more»

Oil from the damaged Deepwater Horizon oil well lingered off the Mississippi Delta on July 4, 2010. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra captured this natural-color image the same day. The oil appears as an uneven light gray shape east-southeast of the Mississippi Delta. The oil was visible to MODIS on July 4 thanks to sunglint. Oil smoothes the surface of the water, making it a better mirror of sunlight. As a result, close to the Sun’s reflection, the oil is brighter than surrounding water. This is especially true between the Mississippi Delta and the Deepwater Horizon location. East of the rig, however, sunglint lightens most of the water, making it more difficult to distinguish oil from oil-free water.

Scientists from the University of South Florida announced on Friday that they have "definitively connected" the underwater oil plumes to BP's ruptured and still slightly leaking well in the Gulf. Read more»

A ship floats among a sea of spilled oil in the Gulf of Mexico after the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster.

The administration’s raging against BP is not going to get the oil to stop flowing or get it cleaned up any faster. It is rank populism for political purposes and is not something the president of the United States, or Congress, should provoke. Read more»

Oil cleanup workers on offshore vessels will begin receiving longer and more thorough safety trainings Tuesday, fulfilling a pledge by OSHA to improve training after it acknowledged that the previous course was inadequate. Read more»

Workers clean the beach at Gulf Shores, Ala.

Medical researchers are this week meeting in New Orleans to discuss how the major oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico will affect human health. Read more»

Jeff Phillips, an environmental contaminants coordinator for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, rescues a Brown Pelican from Barataria Bay, Grand Isle, La., on June 4.

Read the internal document that contradicts BP’s public claims on how much oil is flowing from the leaking Deepwater Horizon well in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more»

The President and Congress want to kick ass. Only trouble is, BP's Mr. Hayward wasn't all that interested in playing that game. Read more» 2

Crewmembers from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit perform rescue training on a HH-65 ‘Dolphin’ helicopter, Mar. 10.

In the wee-morning hours after the Deepwater Horizon exploded, a Coast Guard rescue helicopter being dispatched to pluck oil rig survivors floating in the fire-engulfed waters could not launch because its hoist was broken. Read more»

"We will fight this spill with everything we've got for as long it takes," declared President Obama in a televised address Tuesday, 57 days after the Deepwater Horizon crisis began. With full text and video. Read more»

Heavily oiled brown pelicans captured at Grand Isle, La., on June 3 wait to be cleaned at the Fort Jackson Wildlife Care Center in Buras, La.

The Deepwater Horizon blowout was not the first of BP's safety problems. Internal investigations over the past decade warned senior BP managers that the company repeatedly disregarded safety and environmental rules and risked a serious accident if it did not change its ways. Read more»

Thousands of feet below the surface of the sea, tens of millions of gallons of oil spew into the Gulf of Mexico. We can't see it, so it doesn't seem that real. Yet. Read more»

Opinion: Where, the New York Times asks, have you seen impact of the spill? Here in deepest Provence, for starters. But expect it anywhere you look. Read more»

As BP struggles to cap its well, and CEO Tony Hayward stumbles from unfortunate utterance to unfortunate utterance, fish and birds keep dying. Read more»

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