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How industry scientists stalled action on carcinogen

For the past 60 years, water polluted with chromium (VI) has plagued Hinkley, Calif., the desert town made famous by the film "Erin Brockovich." Although residents there won their lawsuit against the polluter, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., there’s still a debate over whether the compound causes cancer in drinking water. The Environmental Protection Agency says yes, but industry scientists disagree.... Read more»

On a Wyoming ranch, feds sacrifice tomorrow’s water to mine uranium today

Underground vast reservoirs hold billions of gallons of water suitable for drinking, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Yet every day injection wells pump more than 200,000 gallons of toxic and radioactive waste from uranium mining into local aquifers.... Read more»

Biomass power may not be so green after all

The 'biomass' industry is plagued by emissions fines and allegations of racism and shoddy plant construction.... Read more»

Let the distortions begin: Election 2012 sneak preview

It has been seven weeks now since the midterms, but that doesn't mean there's no campaigning going on. Republican presidential aspirants are off and running, jockeying for exposure. We've been keeping track, and have noticed some twisting of the truth – already!... Read more»

Chamber seeks cash for anti-regulation effort

Even as it plowed tens of millions of dollars into ads this year to help mostly Republicans notch Congressional victories, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce was initiating a new effort to raise millions more from energy, health insurance, financial services, and other firms to fund a new anti-regulatory campaign. ... Read more»

Big polluters freed from environmental oversight by stimulus

In the name of job creation and clean energy, the Obama administration has doled out billions of dollars in stimulus money to some of the nation’s biggest polluters and granted them sweeping exemptions from the most basic form of environmental oversight, a Center for Public Integrity investigation has found.... Read more»

Think again

When money talks, who listens (besides politicians)?

Everybody knows money talks in politics, but people—and particularly the press—rarely pay attention to exactly how. It can define potential alternatives, invent arguments, inundate with propaganda, and threaten with merely hypothetical opposition.... Read more»

Meet the likely House committee chairs who promise to roll back ‘job-killing’ regs

Impending Republican control of the House means there will be new leaders on powerful House committees. Here’s a quick introduction — or reintroduction — to some of the lawmakers who will likely win these important chairmanships. ... Read more»

Navajos look to reduce dependence on coal

Coal is the second largest source of income for the Navajo. But as the tribe tries to increase revenue and expand its market, a change may be coming.... Read more»

Lame duck Congress may toughen OSHA

For an agency so widely feared and demonized by American business, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is a relative pushover. Compared to the Environmental Protection Agency, which has tough statutes such as the Clean Air Act and Clean Water Act at its disposal, OSHA is a paper tiger.... Read more»1

Center for Biological Diversity

Wildlife groups slam EPA for not banning lead ammunition

The Environmental Protection Agency is shirking its responsibilities and contributing to the deaths of animals by failing to ban the use of lead-based ammunition, according to a coalition of wildlife advocacy groups.... Read more»1

Former Valdez cleanup worker warns of toxic dangers in the Gulf

Merle Savage has never been the same since she spent four months cleaning up Alaska’s oil-contaminated waters and shores after the Exxon Valdez crash. She still feels the toll that took on her health, but as she watches the Gulf, she’s felt something else: Déjà vu.... Read more»

Immigration

For immigrants, an extra challenge in Gulf oil spill

They came to the Gulf Coast as war refugees from Vietnam in the 1980s. After Katrina, they were the very first community to return and rebuild. But just as a sense of normalcy had returned to the community of Vietnamese fishermen, the Gulf Coast oil spill hit.... Read more»

Arizona No. 13 on green states list

Arizona is No. 13 on a list of the nation's greenest states, according to an environmental group.... Read more»

Brownfields

Feds give $800k for enviro cleanup plans

Tucson and Pima County will each receive $400,000 grants from the Environmental Protection Agency to assess brownfields - environmentally-contaminated sites that could be redeveloped.... Read more»