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Centennial Hall will host a powerhouse panel on privacy issues Friday, including a Skype appearance by Edward Snowden. Also appearing will be activist Noam Chomsky and Glenn Greenwald, a reporter who will also speak after a screening Thursday night at the Loft. Read more»

In an age of ubiquitous surveillance, there are still some things you can do to keep your communications private—and not all of it is high-tech. Read more»

American companies are supplying technology that the governments of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan are using to spy on their citizens’ communications and clamp down on dissent, according to a new report from the U.K.-based advocacy group Privacy International. Read more»

Edward Snowden, the whistleblower who leaked top secret documents revealing a vast surveillance program by the US government to the Guardian newspaper. The Guardian's Glenn Greenwald interviewed Snowden in a hotel room in Hong Kong and released the video on Sunday June 10, 2013.

The U.S. government sees Americans as 'the enemy' and other common sense advice in the Snowden era. Read more»

The U.S. intelligence community has been outsourcing much of its sensitive work to private contractors, but it’s had a hard time figuring out just how much and explaining why. That’s made it particularly difficult for lawmakers on Capitol Hill to assess whether the contracting is excessive or wasteful, as some independent groups have alleged. Read more»

Headquarters for U.S. Investigations Services Inc., or USIS, in Falls Church, Virginia.

The inspector general calls the rate "abnormal." Read more»

Analysis: Everybody was expecting a major foreign policy revamp. But the president broke no new ground and struck a defensive pose in his West Point address. Read more»

National Security Operations Center Floor in 2012.

All the NSA reform plans purport to end the bulk phone records collection program, but there are big differences. Read more»

Another day, another revelation from the stockpile of documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. And this time Yahoo video chat users were — or perhaps still are — the target. British surveillance agency GCHQ, with help from NSA, collected and stored images of webcam chats of millions of people around the world — including those not suspected of wrongdoing. Read more»

The latest revelations from documents leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden showed that the American spy agency has secretly been collecting millions of email and chat contact lists around the world. Read more»

Patrick D. Gallagher, 14th Director of NIST, 2009

Following revelations about the NSA’s covert influence on computer security standards, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST, announced earlier this week it is revisiting some of its encryption standards. Read more»

U.S. Sen. John McCain, a leading advocate of military action in Syria, was caught playing poker on his iPhone during a Senate hearing on the issue last week. Read more»

British Prime Minister David Cameron with U.S. President Barack Obama in the grounds of the White House, July 2010.

When it comes to security, the special relationship is raising questions about whether the two countries are doing each other’s dirty work. Read more»

The United States' National Security Agency can observe more online communications of Americans than once believed, according to a new report in the Wall Street Journal. Read more»

When the House of Representatives recently considered an amendment that would have dismantled the NSA’s bulk phone records collection program, the White House swiftly condemned the measure. But only five years ago, Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill. was part of a group of legislators that supported substantial changes to NSA surveillance programs. Read more»

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