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centers for medicare and medicaid servicesRSS

¿Por qué Medicare no paga por las pruebas caseras para COVID?

A partir del 15 de enero, las aseguradoras privadas cubrirán el costo de ocho pruebas rápidas de COVID en el hogar cada mes para sus miembros, pero los beneficiarios de Medicare enfrentan un obstáculo aún mayor: la nueva regla de la administración no se aplica a ellos.... Read more»

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Rural midwives fill gap as hospitals cut childbirth services

As hospitals across the country are struggling to stay afloat amid the coronavirus pandemic, some have had to cut or suspend obstetric services - but at least 8 states, including Arizona, have passed laws expanding coverage for midwifery and doula services.... Read more»

Obamacare enrollment in Arizona rose by 40,000, with more gains likely

More than 40,000 Arizonans signed up for Affordable Care Act health insurance in the six-month special enrollment period earlier this year, and advocates expect the numbers to keep rising in the enrollment period that opens next month. ... Read more»

'Don’t you work with old people?': Many elder-care workers still refuse to get COVID-19 vaccine

As the Delta variant brings a new spike in coronavirus numbers across the nation, only 59% of staff at the nation’s nursing homes and other long-term care facilities are fully or partially vaccinated - with eight states reporting an average rate of less than half.... Read more»

Analysis

Did CDC’s misguided mask advice drive up COVID death toll for health workers?

A new wave of research now shows that several of the “aerosol-generating” procedures considered the riskiest were not the most hazardous to health care workers. Recent studies have determined that a basic cough produces about 20 times more particles than intubation, a procedure one doctor likened to the risk of being next to a nuclear reactor, and patients with COVID simply talking or breathing, even in a well-ventilated room, could make workers sick in the CDC-sanctioned surgical masks. ... Read more»

Rapid coronavirus testing less accurate than government wants to admit

Rapid antigen testing is a mess. The federal government pushed it out without a plan, and then spent weeks denying problems with false positives.... Read more»

Substitute pharmacists warn co-workers: We'll probably bring coronavirus to you

With regular employees out sick, CVS and Walgreens rely on traveling workers to fill in at short notice. But when these floaters show up at a store, they often aren’t told if anyone there has tested positive.... Read more»

FactCheck: Hospital payments & the COVID-19 death count

Q: Are hospitals inflating the number of COVID-19 cases and deaths so they can be paid more? A: Recent legislation pays hospitals higher Medicare rates for COVID-19 patients and treatment, but there is no evidence of fraudulent reporting.... Read more»

Analysis

No matter what some public officials say, the message you need to hear is 'stay home'

Mixed messaging from all levels of government is putting Americans at risk and will speed the spread of the coronavirus. No matter what politicians say, public health experts agree. Stay home, even if you feel fine.... Read more»

Medicare Advantage patients find themselves in regulatory limbo

Medicare pays the privately run health plans — an alternative to traditional Medicare — a set monthly rate for each patient. About 16 million Americans have signed up at an annual cost to taxpayers of more than $160 billion, about one third of the elderly and disabled people eligible for Medicare. A Center for Public Integrity investigation published in June found as much as $70 billion of improper payments to Medicare Advantage plans from 2008 through last year.... Read more»

Obamacare: A midterm report card

The first half of the Obamacare open enrollment period is over, and yesterday, federal health officials announced sign-up figures from the first three months. ... Read more»

Reid overstates reduction in uninsured

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid incorrectly claimed that 9 million Americans “have health care that didn’t have it before” because of the Affordable Care Act. That figure includes an unknown number who previously had insurance but switched to a policy sold through the exchanges, plus an unknown number of Medicaid recipients who renewed their coverage.... Read more»

In a major shift, Medicare wants power to ban harmful prescribers

Medicare plans to arm itself with broad new powers to better control — and potentially ban — doctors engaged in fraudulent or harmful prescribing, following a series of articles by ProPublica detailing lax oversight in its drug program. ... Read more»

HealthCare.gov’s mysterious new number: ‘834’

Now that the front-end of HealthCare.gov appears to be working properly, the media’s focus is quickly shifting to the back-end systems that are supposed to provide insurance companies with accurate information about consumers enrolling in their plans.... Read more»

Consumer Reports on healthcare.gov

GOP Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy falsely claimed Consumer Reports warned “Americans not to go to the [HealthCare.gov] website because of the fear of having fraud.” The consumer advocate initially advised people to wait until the website’s many technical problems were worked out, but it told us that its advice “was not in reference to any concerns regarding fraud.”... Read more»

Why health insurance cancellations shouldn’t be a surprise

There seems to be no letup of bad news on the Affordable Care Act. Yesterday, Healthcare.gov, the problem-plagued federal health insurance marketplace, crashed again. And a pile of news reports focused on citizen anger over policy cancellations prompted by the law. ... Read more»

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