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Policymakers and insurers across the country say they are eliminating copayments, deductibles and other barriers to telemedicine for patients confined at home who need a doctor for any reason. But in a fragmented health system, the shift to cost-free telemedicine for patients is going far less smoothly than the speeches and press releases suggest. In some cases, doctors are billing for telephone calls that used to be free. Read more»

The CDC’s main coronavirus webpage is offered in Spanish, Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese.

On March 16, the White House and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a public alert aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19. The problem: For days, it was in English only – leaving millions of non-English speakers in the U.S. without direct guidance from the federal government amid the deadly and fast-moving pandemic. Read more»

The Deep South has not elected a Democratic senator since 1992, but Alabama drew the line against a wildly unqualified Roy Moore on Tuesday. The natural question for readers here is, If this can happen in Alabama, why not in Arizona? Read more» 1

Sinema, McSally, Ward, Abboud.

Hey, Arizona. It just got real. We could have two races on the ballot in the same year with control of the U.S. Senate on the line. That would be a political showstopper. Read more» 5

Arizonans who still take pride in our state for leading the national charge against undocumented immigration might want to take a quick glance over their shoulders. Where'd our followers go? Read more»

When voters finally get to the polls tomorrow, they may run into more than a big crowd. Voters in many states will be facing a slew of confusing measures and often overly long ballots. Read more»

Health clinics that are part of a 50-year-old federally funded program to treat migrant and seasonal farmworkers have become the latest flash points in the national immigration debate. Read more»

Clarence Aaron was sentenced to three life terms in federal prison without parole for abetting a drug conspiracy. In 2001, he applied for a presidential commutation, an act of clemency he came closer to receiving than he or his advocates knew.

The case of rejected presidential pardon applicant Clarence Aaron illuminates the extraordinary, secretive powers wielded by the Office of the Pardon Attorney, the branch of the Justice Department that reviews commutation requests. Read more»

A mural painted on the main office building of Casa San Juan.

While Tucson officials today say they do not consider the city a designated place of sanctuary, human rights work continues the path of the Sanctuary Movement through local organizations. Read more»

Supporters and protesters rally at the State Capitol in January.

If the Supreme Court gives its blessing to SB 1070, the nation will return to a time of deep division, likely cleaved once again along regional lines. Read more» 7

Mitt Romney

It could have been the awkward “y’alls” that did it, or the forced references to “cheesy grits,” but the South roundly rejected former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney Tuesday night. Read more»

People hold signs denouncing SB 1070 outside the White House during a meeting between Gov. Jan Brewer and President Obama on June 3, 2010.

Have state anti-immigration bills led to an exodus of unauthorized migrants from the United States as restrictionists have promised? Read more» 1

People protest Alabama's immigration law, HB 56 in Montgomery, Ala., on Dec. 17.

Alabama's immigration law's impact has been swift and detrimental to the state, with a significant exodus of Latinos. But in a state already ravaged by tornadoes and lagging in economic recovery, the costs and social effects of the law have been particularly harsh. Read more»

The number of death sentences in the United States fell to below 100 in 2011, a historic low in the last 35 years. Read more» 1

A controversial immigration law that would require Alabama residents to prove their citizenship when registering a mobile home has been blocked. Read more»

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