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Detainees at Camp X-Ray at Naval Base Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, Jan. 11, 2002

The United States revealed the names and nationalities of 48 Guantanamo captives considered impossible to try yet unsafe to release. Read more»

A predator drone

In February, during his confirmation process, CIA director John Brennan offered an unusually straightforward explanation: “Where possible, we also work with local governments to gather facts, and, if appropriate, provide condolence payments to families of those killed.” Read more»

Traumatic brain injuries have been called the 'signature wound' of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. While improvements in armor and battlefield medicine mean more soldiers are surviving bomb blasts that would have killed them in previous wars, the explosions are leaving some of them with permanent wounds. Mild traumatic brain injuries are difficult to detect as they leave behind no obvious signs of trauma. While many soldiers recover fully from the injury, others are left with persistent mental and physical problems.

More than half of all Iraq and Afghanistan veterans treated in VA hospitals since 2002 have been diagnosed, at least preliminarily, with mental health problems. Read more»