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No matter how many times people debunk the notion that government policy created the housing bubble, it doesn't die. Now, we are having another argument about whether the government is creating a new housing disaster for taxpayers. The target this time: the Federal Housing Administration. Read more»

Fannie Mae headquarters

The taxpayer-backed mortgage giants, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, play a huge and growing role in the economy yet are riven by conflicts of interest and clashing goals. Read more»

Percentage of all new mortgages backed by the U.S. government.

The home loan market was nationalized in a slapdash fashion and is now riven by conflicts of interest and competing goals. To solve it, a consensus is forming to head down the path of the least resistance but greatest risk. Read more»

In President Obama's second term, financial regulation would finally appear to have the leverage. Wall Street spent zillions on Mitt Romney, who had promised to roll back financial reform, and lost. Elizabeth Warren now sits in the world's greatest deliberative body. Read more»

At least four parties had legal disputes with Bain during the early 1990s, when Romney led the company, raising questions of how rough-and-tumble the company could be.

Romney's private equity firm battled with brokers, also asked them to find healthy companies, not just turnarounds. Read more»

Reducing mortgages would help keep hundreds of thousands of families in their homes, save Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae money and help taxpayers, the mortgage giants said. Read more»

Two weeks ago, Standard & Poor's put out a press release: The credit rating agency warned it was poised to downgrade almost 1,200 complex mortgage securities. So what? Isn't that dog-bites-man at this point? Read more»