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In its annual short-term job projection, the Arizona of Economic Opportunity estimates Arizona will gain about 153,000 jobs between the third quarter of 2017 and first quarter of 2019. Pima County is expected to gain about 13,300 jobs.The fastest growth will be in suburban Maricopa County. Read more»

An annual revision, using more accurate federal data, showed that Tucson ended up 3,600 more jobs in 2017 than previously reported. But we continue to rank near the bottom of the state's metro areas for job growth. Read more» 1

Metro Tucson ended 2017 with a job growth of a scant .5 percent – about 1,900 jobs. But those numbers are likely to shift upward after the state revises them to correlate with more concrete federal employment numbers. Results will be released in March. Read more»

Arizona officials have been saying for most of the year that metro Tucson is either barely adding jobs or just losing a few. But more accurate federal numbers show Tucson may be adding jobs at a healthy rate. Read more»

Despite state numbers that show metro Tucson's job growth will be flat or negative this year, UA economist George Hammond is predicting meager growth of .8 to one percent. But while the job market may be weak, the housing market is doing well. Read more»

Arizona gained 32,000 jobs over the past year, while Tucson lost 3,900, according to a state office. A University of Arizona economist, though, believes that assessment is too pessimistic. Metro Tucson real estate, meanwhile, is seeing some bright spots. Read more»

Arizona and especially metro Phoenix continued to have healthy job growth in September while the Tucson area struggled. Still, Tucson's unemployment rate fell to 4.2 percent. Read more»

Online sales now account for about nine percent of all U.S. retail sales, and that is shifting more jobs from traditional stores to warehouse and package delivery in Tucson and the rest of the nation. And the Tucson metro area continues to lag the rest of Arizona in job growth, but experts say more hires are likely. Read more»

Metro Tucson in June had 1,900 more people employed than a year earlier, and most of those new jobs were at restaurants and bars. Aerospace, call centers, and financial activities also showed good job growth. Read more»

May surveys from the Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity show that not only does metro Tucson continue to lag the rest of the state in job growth but appears to be shedding high-paying professional and business service jobs. Read more»

A growing shortage of workers has been driving up average earnings since mid-2015, long before Arizonans voted to increase the minimum wage. In Pima County, the jobless rate not only fell in April to 4.2 percent from 4.4 percent in March but came in lower than the state and national rates. But job growth is still slow. Read more»

About 20,000 people have been getting jobs each month for the first three months of the year in Arizona. While Tucson's job growth remains at the bottom of the list, but the unemployment rate here is lower than the statewide average. The increase in the state's minimum wage don't appear to have stemmed job growth. Read more»

Despite all the job announcements over the past two years from Raytheon, Comcast, Caterpillar and other companies, Tucson’s job growth continues to be weak, especially compared with the rest of the state. The metro area only gained 900 jobs from January 2016 to January 2017, and its .2 percent growth was at the bottom of Arizona's seven major metros. Read more»

A New York group urging immigration reform has calculated that about 900,000 immigrants living in Arizona contribute at least $21.4 billion to the state’s economy through purchases as well as taxes. Read more»

An outright repeal of the federal Affordable Care Act would cost Arizona about 29,400 health care jobs next year — and could throw the state’s healthiest economic sector into a one-year recession, an Arizona State University economist said. Read more»

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