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Bersin at a Tucson press conference, February 2011.

Alan Bersin says a border wall won’t address the real challenges confronting the U.S. border enforcement system: hopelessly understaffed immigration courts and lawlessness and poverty in Central America. Read more»

Denis Villeneuve’s movie gets much right about the borderlands but crosses the line into exaggeration. A veteran border correspondent compares the film’s underworld to the one he knows. Read more»

At the request of a human rights association, members of the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team traveled to Dos Erres in the 1990s and excavated bodies from the well.

Shaken by sobs, his head bowed, a former Guatemalan commando testified last week that he wept as he hurled a little boy to his death in a village well 31 years ago while a commanding officer, Lt. Jorge Vinicio Sosa Orantes, snarled: “This is a job for men!” Read more»

The suicide bombing at al-Nairab military base in northern Syria on June 1, 2012, as seen in a propaganda video by al-Nusrah, al-Qaida's Syrian branch.

Western support for the opposition in Syria's bloody civil war raises fears of a blowback from the European extremists who've flocked to new land of jihad. Read more»

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad with Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez.

Last year, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad visited his ally President Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, where the firebrand leaders unleashed defiant rhetoric at the United States. Read more»

As debate rages in the United States about the National Security Agency’s sweeping data-mining programs, sources overseas speak about the controversy and how differing U.S. and European approaches to counterterrorism can complement each other. Read more»

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

As an eighth-grader in a Cambridge public school, suspected Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was quiet, friendly, spoke good English and seemed at home in his adopted country. While hundreds of police officers pursued the 19-year-old during a nationally-televised rampage across Boston Friday, a former classmate recounted memories of the refugee who, according to counterterror officials, became a U.S. citizen on an ironic date: Sept. 11, 2012. Read more» 1

An unidentified man weeps on the day in December 2011 when Guatemalan President Álvaro Colom made a formal apology to the victims of the massacre at Las Dos Erres, Guatemala, in 1982.

Retired Col. César Adán Rosales Batres, a veteran of the elite Kaibil commandos of the Guatemalan Army, is a wanted war criminal and a fugitive with an Interpol warrant on his head. But according to recent information obtained by ProPublica, he hasn't run far. The ease with which he eludes capture shows the fight for justice remains difficult in Guatemala. Read more»

As the net flow of immigrants from Mexico nears zero, violent and impoverished Central American countries have emerged as the fastest-rising source of illegal immigrants to the U.S. Fleeing violence as well as poverty, they journey through a gantlet of predators, crossing Mexico's southern frontier in an area that has become a U.S. national security concern. Read more»

Jorge Vinicio Sosa Orantes, seen here as a young soldier, denies any role in the slaughter of 250 villagers at Dos Erres in 1982.

In May 1985, a Guatemalan Army lieutenant named Jorge Vinicio Sosa Orantes deserted, flew to San Francisco and requested political asylum, asserting that leftist guerrillas in his war-torn homeland were gunning for him. Read more»

An unidentified man weeps on the day in December 2011 when Guatemalan President Álvaro Colom made a formal apology to the victims of the massacre at Las Dos Erres, Guatemala, in 1982.

It was Tranquilino Castañeda's first visit to the United States. And the first time that he would see his son in person after almost three decades during which he thought his boy had died in a massacre in Guatemala. Read more»

A Hezbollah banner in Lebanon, 2007.

U.S. authorities are building a politically explosive case that Hezbollah, the Lebanese militant group, finances itself through a vast drug smuggling network that links a Lebanese bank, a violent Mexican cartel and U.S. cocaine users. Read more»

The Saudi embassy in Washington, D.C.

The alleged Iranian plot to use Mexican cartel gunmen to assassinate the Saudi ambassador in Washington is one of the strangest, most serious terrorism cases to surface in years, a mix of seemingly credible evidence and unlikely scenarios that departs dramatically from Iran’s past record of global terrorist activity. Read more»

A plot to attack Denmark was detailed by confessed terrorist David Coleman Headley during the Mumbai terror attack trial Tuesday in Chicago.

An officer in Pakistan’s intelligence service chose a Jewish center as a target for the 2008 Mumbai attacks and then helped launch a new plot against Denmark, according to the star witness in a terror trial in Chicago. Read more»

A confessed terrorist took the stand in a Chicago courtroom Monday and described a close alliance between Pakistan's intelligence service and the Lashkar-i-Taiba terrorist group, alleging that Pakistani officers recruited him and played a central role in planning the 2008 Mumbai attacks. Read more»

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