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The continuing questions surrounding the Jan. 6, 2021 Capitol attack have prompted calls for a more sustained inquiry than has so far taken place.

More than 15 hours of testimony failed to answer fundamental questions about the Capitol attack. Among them: Why national security officials responded differently to BLM protesters than to Trump supporters. Read more»

A report advocating death penalty reforms finds that false confessions in capital cases can be limited by recording the questioning of suspects. Read more»

President Obama has directed the Centers for Disease Control to research gun violence as part of his legislative package on gun control. The CDC hasn't pursued this kind of research since 1996 when the National Rifle Association lobbied Congress to cut funding for it. Read more»

Last month, President Obama unveiled sweeping proposals on gun control. To get a sense of what the NRA might do, it's helpful to look at how it scored a victory during the last major federal initiative to tighten gun control. Read more»

A bill heralded by lawmakers as a victory for thousands of homeowners harmed by contaminated drywall was weakened after input from the homebuilding industry. Read more»

While legislators in Virginia, Alabama, Arizona, New York, Texas and Colorado sometimes contemplated tightening rules after rampage shootings, few measures gained passage. In fact, several states - including Arizona - have made it easier to buy more guns and take them to more places. Read more»

Army soldiers practice hand-to-hand combat in 2008.

A new military study has found that almost 6 percent of soldiers who took hand-to-hand combat courses at a Texas Army base were struck in the head and suffered symptoms the Pentagon says are consistent with concussions. Read more»

National Intrepid Center of Excellence

Although 230,000 soldiers have been diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries, only 20 at a time get advanced personalized rehabilitation at a new state-of-the-art treatment center — and they must stay in the military to do so. Read more»

U.S. Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J.

Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., took to the House floor on Thursday to denounce flaws in the military's cognitive testing program and garner support to fix it following a ProPublica and NPR story on the issue earlier this week. Read more»

U.S. Army soldiers in Spin Boldak district, Kandahar, Afghanistan, on Nov. 19.

A measure requiring the military to test soldiers' brain function before they deployed and again when they returned has failed to deliver, offering injured soldiers the appearance of help, but not the reality. Read more»

Traumatic brain injuries have been called the 'signature wound' of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. While improvements in armor and battlefield medicine mean more soldiers are surviving bomb blasts that would have killed them in previous wars, the explosions are leaving some of them with permanent wounds. Mild traumatic brain injuries are difficult to detect as they leave behind no obvious signs of trauma. While many soldiers recover fully from the injury, others are left with persistent mental and physical problems.

More than half of all Iraq and Afghanistan veterans treated in VA hospitals since 2002 have been diagnosed, at least preliminarily, with mental health problems. Read more»

Two years after thousands of Americans learned that defective Chinese drywall had contaminated their houses, a new group of homeowners say they are experiencing similar problems—but their homes are built with drywall made in the U.S. Read more»

As the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the White House are trying to minimize their differences, a brewing battle at OSHA over a workplace injury reporting rule illustrates how tough that could become given the administration's pro-labor leanings. Read more»