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A case before federal appeals court judges will decide if tribal parents will continue to get preference in adopting Native American children as conservatives groups sue to end race-based adoption. Read more»

Sex trafficking is a fast-growing criminal enterprise. In response, some states are looking for help in combating the trafficking where it’s likely to occur. Read more»

The nation’s growing diversity is not reflected in state legislatures. Nationwide, African-Americans, who make up 13 percent of the U.S. population, account for 9 percent of state legislators, according to a new survey. Latinos, who are 17 percent of the population, only account for 5 percent of state legislators. Read more»

Many cities are cracking down on panhandling, driven by the unlikely combination of thriving downtowns and the lingering effects of the Great Recession. But such bans have faced legal challenges — and a recent Supreme Court ruling in an Arizona case provided ammunition to those who argue such laws trample free speech. Read more»

Two young girls sit in their holding area where hundreds of mostly Central American immigrant children are being processed and held at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center on June 18, 2014.

In 2014, roughly 69,000 kids from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras flooded the U.S.-Mexico border, traveling alone at great personal peril. A year later, the number of unaccompanied children arriving at U.S. borders has dropped significantly. But the immigration status of many of these children remains in flux. Read more»

Birth rates for black and Latina teens have dropped steeply in the past two decades—at a much faster clip than that of white teens. Despite this, black and Latina girls are still more than twice as likely as white girls to become pregnant before they leave adolescence. Read more»

Hazel Loarca, 7, drinks her milk in the cafeteria area at a Los Angeles elementary school earlier this month. When the older population is predominantly white and the school-age population is not, Americans are more likely to vote “no” on local tax referendums to finance public school education.

America’s growing racial generation gap, and what it means for state policy on everything from schools to job training to mass transit. Read more»

A year after open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act began, one in four Latinos does not have health insurance, more than any other ethnic population in the country. And most states are doing little to help those in the coverage gap. Read more»

States are increasingly interested in reducing domestic violence, but none of them are trying to prevent domestic violence by focusing on specific demographic groups. Advocates say that’s a problem, stressing stress that states must consider the influence of race, culture and other demographic factors to craft effective strategies. Read more»

Creating a new census category would have economic and political ramifications for Americans of Middle Eastern and North African descent. Read more»

A members of the Mara Salvatrucha gang displays his tattoos inside the Chelatenango prison in El Salvador, 2007.

Critics say the way cities and states dealt with gangs 20 or more years ago greatly contributed to the recent surge in Central American kids crossing the U.S.-Mexico border alone. Read more» 1