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After a long downward trend, U.S. traffic deaths are on the rise again, and a key factor is the stubbornly high fatality toll among some of the most exposed people on the road: motorcyclists. Nevertheless, federal regulators have balked at requiring a safety measure that, many experts say, could save hundreds of bikers’ lives every year. Read more»

Concerns about Alzheimer's and other brain-wasting diseases have fueled booming sales of dietary supplements. But experts question the benefits. Read more»

A 2015 Ford Explorer XLT 3.5.

Federal regulators are investigating a possible defect in Ford Explorers following scores of complaints about exhaust and carbon monoxide pouring into the passenger compartments of the popular SUVs. Read more» 1

A fatal motorcycle accident in San Diego County on Jan. 30, 2011.

After years of inaction, federal regulators are trying to crack down on the use of cheap novelty helmets linked to thousands of motorcycle crash deaths and injuries in recent years. Read more»

Erin Shero and her youngest son, Colton Shero, in the spring of 2013, about five months before the toddler was fatally strangled by a window blind cord. 'My son died in less time than it takes to pop a bag of popcorn,' Shero said.

Despite years of talk, kids are still dying because of hazardous cords on window blinds. At least 332 children, most of them under the age of two, have been fatally strangled by window cords over the last 30 years. Another 165 have been injured, including some who suffered permanent brain damage or quadriplegia requiring lifelong care. Read more»

In April 2012, a team of inspectors from the FDA investigated a seafood company in India that had been exporting tons of frozen yellow fin tuna to the U.S. What they found was not appetizing: water tanks rife with contamination, rusty carving knives, peeling paint above the work area, unsanitary bathrooms and an ice machine covered with insects and “apparent bird feces.” Read more»

The results were tragic but not surprising last May when Suzanne Randa and her fiance, Thomas Donohoe, crashed while riding Donohoe’s Harley Davidson. Donohoe, who was wearing a helmet meeting federal safety standards, escaped injury and walked away from the accident. Randa, 49, who wore a so-called novelty helmet that was cheap and stylish but offered no real protection, died at the scene after the strap broke and her head slammed onto the pavement. Read more»

Guns galore, inadequate checks: The background check system is supposed to keep firearms away from potentially dangerous people, but the system is plagued by data problems, loopholes and disputes over just who should be barred. "There is a problem with a system like that. It is harder for a high school kid to get a job at McDonald’s." (with video) Read more»

In a highly touted safety achievement, deaths on the nation's roads and highways have fallen sharply in recent years, to the lowest total in more than a half-century. But motorcyclists have missed out on that dramatic improvement, and the news for them has been increasingly grim. Read more» 2

A man carries a weapon during a gun rights rally in Campbell, Ohio, in April 2010.

Seven years after Ohio first allowed citizens to carry concealed weapons, more than a quarter-million Ohioans have concealed carry permits. People debate the impact, although the fact that the identity of the permit holders is off limits to the general public makes that tough. Read more»

After a deadly shootout with suspected members of the Beltran-Leyva cartel on May 26th, 2008, that left eight policemen dead, authorities seized a variety of guns, including seven AK-47s, as well as 36 magazines, and 500 rounds of ammunition, according to ATF investigative reports.

It's mostly illegal to import foreign-made assault weapons, but Century Arms has found a way to legally market these guns in the U.S. Many make their way south, to be used by Mexican drug cartels. Read more» 1