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Amnesty Int'l calls on Mexican gov't to protect journalists

Rights group: Failure to act has led to more violence against reporters

Amnesty International said Thursday that the Mexican government needs to do more to protect journalists from the attacks of drug cartels.

The government’s failure to act, the London-based human rights organization said, has led to increased violence against reporters across Mexico.

“Mexico has become one of the most dangerous countries in the world to be a journalist,” said Javier Zuniga, a special advisor to Amnesty International. “Mexican authorities have to show that they do not tolerate threats and violence against the media by putting in effective preventative measures, leading impartial investigations on these attacks and assuring those responsible are brought to justice.”

The comments follow a new wave of attacks on media outlets.

On Tuesday, a group of armed men drove past offices of the Siglo del Torreon in the northern state of Coauhuila and sprayed the building with bullets.

On Monday, two employees of the El Financiero disappeared in the state of Zacatecas.

On Nov. 6, assailants burned down offices of El Bueno Tono newspaper in state of Veracruz.

In 2000, when Mexico ended 71 years of one party rule, journalists hoped they would enjoy a new era of freedom.

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However, since then a total of 74 Mexican journalists have been murdered according to National Human Rights Commission.

Most attacks are believed to come from drug cartels who now finance death squads in much of Mexico.

But in the vast majority of journalists killings, no culprits have been arrested or convicted.

This article originally appeared on GlobalPost.

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