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U.K. has night of relative calm after rioting
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U.K. has night of relative calm after rioting

Huge police operation and heavy rain lead to a lull in the riots

  • Investigators work at the scene where three men were struck and killed by a car Wednesday in Birmingham during riots that have plagued the U.K. since Sunday.
    skynews screengrabInvestigators work at the scene where three men were struck and killed by a car Wednesday in Birmingham during riots that have plagued the U.K. since Sunday.

A fifth night of violence was prevented in Britain with a huge police operation and heavy rain in some areas.

During the evening magistrates worked around the clock to fast track people suspected of rioting.

There is a cross-range of races, gender, class and ages charged according to reports.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, the suspects range from an organic chef and an opera house steward to an 11-year-old boy, as well as university students and members of the upper-middle class.

Fitzroy Thomas, a 43-year-old organic chef, was accused with his brother Ronald, 47, of smashing up a branch of the Nando's chicken restaurant chain in Clapham, south London, the Times reported.

Laura Johnson, the 19-year-old student and daughter of a successful company director who lives in a sprawling Kent farmhouse, was accused of looting electrical goods.

According to the Guardian, the rioters came from different racial groups, women also joined in and the ages of those involved ranged from their teens to their 40s.

Overnight in Birmingham, a vigil has been held for three men who died after being hit by a car while protecting their houses.

The Prime Minister David Cameron will this morning make a statement on the rioting during an emergency session of Parliament.

He is expected to give details of financial help for people who have lost homes or businesses.

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg said the government's first obligation was to "show that we can keep our streets safe".

"It's a basic need that we've all got to know that our homes, our shops, our communities can be kept safe at times like this," Mr Clegg told BBC Radio 4's Today program.

"I think the immediate priority is to see through what the police have been doing successfully in the last few days, which is getting on top of the situation, making sure that the streets are safe again, getting people into court and getting them behind bars where appropriate."

This article originally appeared on GlobalPost.

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