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Photos: Remembering D-Day, June 6, 1944
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Photos: Remembering D-Day, June 6, 1944

  • Carrying full equipment, American assault troops move onto Utah Beach on the northern coast of France. Landing craft, in the background, jams the harbor.
    U.S. military photoCarrying full equipment, American assault troops move onto Utah Beach on the northern coast of France. Landing craft, in the background, jams the harbor.
  • A LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel) from the U.S. Coast Guard-manned USS Samuel Chase disembarks troops of Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division (the Big Red One) wading onto the Fox Green section of Omaha Beach (Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France) on the morning of June 6, 1944. American soldiers encountered the newly formed German 352nd Division when landing. During the initial landing two-thirds of the Company E became casualties.
    Chief Photographer's Mate (CPHoM) Robert F. SargentA LCVP (Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel) from the U.S. Coast Guard-manned USS Samuel Chase disembarks troops of Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division (the Big Red One) wading onto the Fox Green section of Omaha Beach (Calvados, Basse-Normandie, France) on the morning of June 6, 1944. American soldiers encountered the newly formed German 352nd Division when landing. During the initial landing two-thirds of the Company E became casualties.
  • Royal Marine Commandos attached to 3rd Division move inland from Sword Beach on the Normandy coast, 6 June 1944. Royal Marine Commandos attached to 3rd Division for the assault on Sword Beach move inland, 6 June 1944. A Churchill bridgelayer can be seen in the background.
    Evans, J L (Capt), No 5 Army Film & Photographic UnitRoyal Marine Commandos attached to 3rd Division move inland from Sword Beach on the Normandy coast, 6 June 1944. Royal Marine Commandos attached to 3rd Division for the assault on Sword Beach move inland, 6 June 1944. A Churchill bridgelayer can be seen in the background.
  • Normandy Invasion, June 1944 A convoy of Landing Craft Infantry (Large) sails across the English Channel toward the Normandy Invasion beaches on
    U.S. Coast GuardNormandy Invasion, June 1944 A convoy of Landing Craft Infantry (Large) sails across the English Channel toward the Normandy Invasion beaches on "D-Day", 6 June 1944. Each of these landing craft is towing a barrage balloon for protection against low-flying German aircraft. Among the LCI(L)s present are: LCI(L)-56, at far left; LCI(L)-325; and LCI(L)-4.
  • U.S. Army Rangers show off the ladders they used to storm the cliffs at Pointe du Hoc, which they assaulted in support of Omaha Beach landings on D-Day.
    U.S. Navy photoU.S. Army Rangers show off the ladders they used to storm the cliffs at Pointe du Hoc, which they assaulted in support of Omaha Beach landings on D-Day.
  • Troops in an LCVP landing craft approaching Omaha Beach on D-Day, 6 June 1944. Note helmet netting; faint 'No Smoking' sign on the LCVP's ramp; and M1903 rifles and M1 carbines carried by some of these men.
    Army Signal CorpsTroops in an LCVP landing craft approaching Omaha Beach on D-Day, 6 June 1944. Note helmet netting; faint 'No Smoking' sign on the LCVP's ramp; and M1903 rifles and M1 carbines carried by some of these men.
  • British commandos of 47 (RM) Commando coming ashore from LCAs (Landing Craft Assault) on Jig Green beach, Gold area, 6 June 1944. LCTs can be seen in the background unloading priority vehicles for 231st Brigade, 50th Division.
    No 5 Army Film & Photographic Unit, Midgley (Sgt)British commandos of 47 (RM) Commando coming ashore from LCAs (Landing Craft Assault) on Jig Green beach, Gold area, 6 June 1944. LCTs can be seen in the background unloading priority vehicles for 231st Brigade, 50th Division.
  • Personnel of Royal Canadian Navy Beach Commando 'W' landing on Mike Beach, Juno sector of the Normandy beachhead. June 6th, 1944.
    National Archives of CanadaPersonnel of Royal Canadian Navy Beach Commando 'W' landing on Mike Beach, Juno sector of the Normandy beachhead. June 6th, 1944.
  • The Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery, September 2006. The cemetery contains predominantly Canadian soldiers killed during the Battle of Normandy. The cemetery contains 4 British soldiers and one French national who was killed fighting alongside Canadian troops. The British soldiers have markers very similar to the Canadian markers, but with different insignia in place of the maple leaf. The grave containing the French national is marked with a cross, which is visible on the lower left of the photo in the 4th row from the bottom.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryThe Bény-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery, September 2006. The cemetery contains predominantly Canadian soldiers killed during the Battle of Normandy. The cemetery contains 4 British soldiers and one French national who was killed fighting alongside Canadian troops. The British soldiers have markers very similar to the Canadian markers, but with different insignia in place of the maple leaf. The grave containing the French national is marked with a cross, which is visible on the lower left of the photo in the 4th row from the bottom.
  • La Cambe German war cemetery, near Bayeux.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryLa Cambe German war cemetery, near Bayeux.
  • In preparation for the invasion, artillery equipment is loaded aboard LCTS at an English port. Brixham, England. 1 June 1944.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryIn preparation for the invasion, artillery equipment is loaded aboard LCTS at an English port. Brixham, England. 1 June 1944.
  • Anti-aircraft halftracks to support initial wave of the assault against Hitler’s Europe begins are being loaded onto an LCT in a British port. Undated - June 1944.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryAnti-aircraft halftracks to support initial wave of the assault against Hitler’s Europe begins are being loaded onto an LCT in a British port. Undated - June 1944.
  • These American troops are marching through the streets of a British port town on their way to the docks where they will be loaded into landing craft for the big assault. Undated - June 1944.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryThese American troops are marching through the streets of a British port town on their way to the docks where they will be loaded into landing craft for the big assault. Undated - June 1944.
  • Gen Dwight D Eisenhower gives the order of the Day. 'Full victory - nothing else' to paratroopers in England, just before they board their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryGen Dwight D Eisenhower gives the order of the Day. 'Full victory - nothing else' to paratroopers in England, just before they board their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe.
  • Assault landing. One of the first waves at Omaha. The Coast Guard caption identifies the unit as Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryAssault landing. One of the first waves at Omaha. The Coast Guard caption identifies the unit as Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division.
  • Members of an American landing party lend helping hands to other members of their organization whose landing craft was sunk be enemy action of the coast of France. These survivors reached Omaha Beach, by using a life raft. Photographer: Weintraub, 6 June 1944.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryMembers of an American landing party lend helping hands to other members of their organization whose landing craft was sunk be enemy action of the coast of France. These survivors reached Omaha Beach, by using a life raft. Photographer: Weintraub, 6 June 1944.
  • Photo taken on D+2, after relief forces reached the Rangers at Point Du Hoe. The American flag had been spread out to stop fire of friendly tanks coming from inland. Some German prisoners are being moved in after capture by the relieving forces.
    U.S. Army Center of Military HistoryPhoto taken on D+2, after relief forces reached the Rangers at Point Du Hoe. The American flag had been spread out to stop fire of friendly tanks coming from inland. Some German prisoners are being moved in after capture by the relieving forces.
  • Princess Elizabeth inspecting an honour guard during a Royal visit to 2nd (Armoured) Battalion Grenadier Guards, 5th Guards Armoured Brigade, Guards Armoured Division, at Hove, 17 May 1944.
    War Office official photographer, Malindine E G (Captain)Princess Elizabeth inspecting an honour guard during a Royal visit to 2nd (Armoured) Battalion Grenadier Guards, 5th Guards Armoured Brigade, Guards Armoured Division, at Hove, 17 May 1944.
  • Normandy beachhead display at National D-Day Memorial
    Stephen Kellam/FlickrNormandy beachhead display at National D-Day Memorial
  • Rows of white crosses in the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial mark the graves of the thousands of U.S. servicemembers who gave their lives during the D-Day invasion of June 1944. 2009 photo.
    Spc. Adrienne Killingsworth/U.S. ArmyRows of white crosses in the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial mark the graves of the thousands of U.S. servicemembers who gave their lives during the D-Day invasion of June 1944. 2009 photo.
  • Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt Jr.'s burial spot rests at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial. Task Force 68, which is made up of paratroopers from across the U.S. Army and the Parachute Regiment's 4th Battalion from London, England, visited the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, May 31, 2012. The cemetery is located in Colleville sur-Mer, France, and is the final resting spot of thousands of service members who lost their lives on D-Day and throughout WWII. Task Force 68 is in Normandy, France to commemorate the 68th anniversary of D-Day.
    U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne)Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt Jr.'s burial spot rests at the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial. Task Force 68, which is made up of paratroopers from across the U.S. Army and the Parachute Regiment's 4th Battalion from London, England, visited the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial, May 31, 2012. The cemetery is located in Colleville sur-Mer, France, and is the final resting spot of thousands of service members who lost their lives on D-Day and throughout WWII. Task Force 68 is in Normandy, France to commemorate the 68th anniversary of D-Day.
  • Soldiers of the 16th Infantry Regiment, wounded while storming Omaha Beach, wait by the chalk cliffs for evacuation to a field hospital for treatment, D-Day, June 6, 1944.
    U.S. ArmySoldiers of the 16th Infantry Regiment, wounded while storming Omaha Beach, wait by the chalk cliffs for evacuation to a field hospital for treatment, D-Day, June 6, 1944.
  • The D-Day cemetery in Normandy.
    Michal Osmenda/FlickrThe D-Day cemetery in Normandy.
  • WWII re-enactors gather together for D-Day 73 celebrations in St. Mere-Eglise, France.
    U.S. Army photo by Spc. Joseph AgacinskiWWII re-enactors gather together for D-Day 73 celebrations in St. Mere-Eglise, France.
  • WWII re-enactors gather together for D-Day 73 celebrations in St. Mere-Eglise, France.
    U.S. Army photo by Spc. Joseph AgacinskiWWII re-enactors gather together for D-Day 73 celebrations in St. Mere-Eglise, France.
  • Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division serve as Color Guard for the June 4, 2017, 'Iron Mike' dedication in St. Mere-Eglise, France.
    U.S. Army photo by Spc. Joseph AgacinskiSoldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division serve as Color Guard for the June 4, 2017, 'Iron Mike' dedication in St. Mere-Eglise, France.
  • The USAREUR Band performs while soldiers of the 82nd Airborne division participate in a commemorative D-Day jump, June 4, 2017.
    U.S. Army photo by Spc. Joseph AgacinskiThe USAREUR Band performs while soldiers of the 82nd Airborne division participate in a commemorative D-Day jump, June 4, 2017.
  • Soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division serve as color guard during the 73rd D-Day ceremony in St. Mere-Eglise France, June 1, 2017.
    U.S. Army photo by Spc. Joseph AgacinskiSoldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division serve as color guard during the 73rd D-Day ceremony in St. Mere-Eglise France, June 1, 2017.
  • D-Day 73 commemoration ceremony at Omaha Beach, June 6, 2017.
    U.S. Army EuropeD-Day 73 commemoration ceremony at Omaha Beach, June 6, 2017.
  • D-Day 73 commemoration ceremony at Omaha Beach, June 6, 2017.
    U.S. Army EuropeD-Day 73 commemoration ceremony at Omaha Beach, June 6, 2017.
  • Pointe du Hoc Ranger Memorial Ceremony, June 5, 2017.
    U.S. Army EuropePointe du Hoc Ranger Memorial Ceremony, June 5, 2017.
  • Germans commemorate the fallen at D-Day 73 anniversary, Sainte-Mere Eglise, France, June 1, 2017.
    U.S. Army EuropeGermans commemorate the fallen at D-Day 73 anniversary, Sainte-Mere Eglise, France, June 1, 2017.
  • Germans commemorate the fallen at D-Day 73 anniversary, Sainte-Mere Eglise, France, June 1, 2017.
    U.S. Army EuropeGermans commemorate the fallen at D-Day 73 anniversary, Sainte-Mere Eglise, France, June 1, 2017.

It's been 73 years since "the Longest Day" — the landing of Allied troops from the United States, Britain, Canada and other nations as they stormed the beaches of Normandy to press the end of World War II in an attack on Nazi Germany. More than 9,000 Allied troops were killed or wounded, as were thousands of German soldiers.

Eisenhower's D-Day message to troops

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force!

You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you.

In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world.

Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle hardened. He will fight savagely.

But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to Victory!

I have full confidence in your courage and devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory! Good luck! And let us beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking.

SIGNED: Dwight D. Eisenhower

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