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A year later, Arivaca checkpoint remains

Group of Arivaca residents hold 24-hour vigil and observation to mark a year of protests against a Border Patrol checkpoint on Arivaca Road, east of I-19.
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8 comments on this story

1
343 comments
Dec 9, 2014, 7:51 am
-0 +2

They are polite and professional to you Mr Hoffman because you are upper class and white and not Latino…maybe you should google how former Gov Raul Castro an elderly gentleman who was forced to stand in the hot sun for several hours

2
318 comments
Dec 9, 2014, 11:46 am
-3 +2

Do I read this story right.  We have a reporter attributing a statement to the group No More Deaths , that the Border Patrol is responsible for deaths in the desert because they have the strategy to use the desert as a natural defensive barrier. OMG///////////??????What nonsense these people can come up with. At taxpayer expense, the border patrol has rescued any number of border jumpers in the desert.

3
1770 comments
Dec 9, 2014, 11:49 am
-2 +1

I’m thinking this checkpoint will still be here five, ten, perhaps twenty years from now. As long as there are people who won’t respect the border or our sovereignty, this checkpoint will always be needed. Sure, it sucks, but that’s the world we live in. It is the best of two bad choices.

4
556 comments
Dec 9, 2014, 12:48 pm
-0 +2

@buddhaboy,
That’s not merely a claim made by NMD, but a 2006 finding by the Government Accounting Office, and a strategy that’s been widely acknowledged by CBP officials.

5
2 comments
Dec 9, 2014, 2:04 pm
-0 +2

And many reports of “border jumpers” being raped by border patrol. Is that at “taxpayer expense” Maybe not as linear as you wish it to be.

6
318 comments
Dec 9, 2014, 4:37 pm
-0 +0

Dylan Smith got up on a soapbox and yelled:

@buddhaboy,
That’s not merely a claim made by NMD, but a 2006 finding by the Government Accounting Office, and a strategy that’s been widely acknowledged by CBP officials.

I see nothing in that report from 2006 that confirms the claim by NMD that deaths in the desert are a consequence of a BP strategy to use the desert as a natural defensive barrier.

7
318 comments
Dec 9, 2014, 4:51 pm
-0 +0

overgrowmexico typed:

And many reports of “border jumpers” being raped by border patrol. Is that at “taxpayer expense” Maybe not as linear as you wish it to be.

In your futile attempt to equate my comment on taxpayer costs to rescue border jumpers in the desert and rape by BP, you have failed. Linear? you should try that sometime instead of falling over your misguided correlation.

8
556 comments
Dec 9, 2014, 4:59 pm
-0 +0

@buddhaboy

Further, the majority of the increase in deaths during this period occurred within the Border Patrols Tucson Sectorwhich includes much of the Arizona desert. Our analysis of the NCHS data indicates that, between 1990 and 2003, more than three-fourths of the rise in migrant border-crossing deaths along the southwest border can be attributed to an increase in deaths in the Tucson Sector. Over this period, deaths due to exposure, especially heat-related exposure, increased substantially, while deaths from traffic fatalities and homicide declined. This pattern represents a major shift in the causes of migrant bordercrossing deaths, as traffic fatalities were the leading cause of migrant border-crossing deaths during the early 1990s, while from the late 1990s onward, heat exposure was the leading cause of death. The increase in deaths due to heat exposure over the last 15 years is consistent with our previous report that found evidence that migrant traffic shifted from urban areas like San Diego and El Paso into the desert following the implementation of the Southwest Border Strategy in 1994. 

... 

In 1994, the Attorney General announced plans for the Southwest Border Strategy, an enforcement initiative designed to strengthen enforcement of the nations immigration laws and to shut down the traditional corridors for the flow of illegal immigration along the southwest border. The strategy called for the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS)5 to incrementally increase control of the border in four phases with the goal of making it increasingly difficult and costly for migrants to attempt illegal entry so that fewer individuals would try. The strategy called for adding resources along the southwest border by first concentrating personnel and technology in those sectors with the highest levels of illegal immigration activity (as measured by apprehensions) and by then moving to the areas with the least activity. Additional Border Patrol resources were initially allocated in the San Diego, California, and El Paso, Texas, sectors. The strategy assumed that as the urban areas were controlled, the migrant traffic would shift to more remote areas where the Border Patrol would be able to more easily detect and apprehend migrants entering illegally. The strategy also assumed that natural barriers including rivers, such as the Rio Grande in Texas, the mountains east of San Diego, and the desert in Arizona would act as deterrents to illegal entry

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