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Tens of thousands protest SB 1070 at Phoenix march

Tens of thousands of protesters marched on Arizona's State Capitol in Phoenix Saturday as they demonstrated against the state's controversial immigration law, SB 1070. (Updated with video)
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6 comments on this story

1
7 comments
May 29, 2010, 4:47 pm
-1 +0

Some “social media” reports? What a dude’s tweet, or some chick’s iPhone update to Facebook? OK, so when the Tea Party march in D.C. last year had “social media” reports of “millions in attendance,” did you take those numbers seriously? In case you forgot, I’ll remind you that you didn’t. And for the record, I oppose SB 1070 for a variety of reasons, so I am sympathetic to the protesters, nonetheless, I am acutely aware of the bias at work here.

2
3 comments
May 30, 2010, 2:35 pm
-0 +1

There were between 40,000 and 50,000 peaceful people protesting SB1070 in Phx yesterday. I’ve attended numerous marches over the past 35+ years and was trained to estimate crowds. I was in place a few blocks from the capitol before the march arrived, and I stood there until the last police vehicle marked the end of the demonstrators. It took more than 2+ hours for everyone to pass by, and although there were times when there were some gaps (because of police allowing traffic to flow, I assume), most of the time people filled the entire street, from sidewalk to sidewalk. I think that the difference between the Associated Press estimate of 10,000 to 20,000 (ignoring possible political motivation) is that the reporter was at the beginning of the march and then jumped ahead to the final rally. With a march this long (5 miles) on a really warm day, many people didn’t march the whole thing, lots joined along the way, and there were thousands of people waiting at the capitol who didn’t march at all. It was a beautiful event, and it shows the commitment of those who think this law is wrong. No doubt—at least 40,000 and probably closer to 50,000 souls. Here’s to a more compassionate Arizona! lily

3
556 comments
May 30, 2010, 2:42 pm
-0 +1

Thanks for your take on the march, sweetlily.

Can you tell us a bit about the speakers? There wasn’t much coverage of the rally at the Capitol at all.

4
3 comments
May 30, 2010, 3:15 pm
-0 +1

@Dylan, Thanks for your interest and for the article. Unfortunately, I can’t be that helpful about the speakers because the rally at the Capitol started long before the march was over (which is quite common), and by the time I got to the Capitol, I just found a spot in the shade and watched the crowd and talked to people. So, I didn’t hear much from the stage except music.

One big problem in the media coverage so far is the assumption that most people who marched were Mexican. It seemed to me that most people who marched were American (yes, even the ones carrying the “Undocumented and Unafraid” posters), who understand that we will all have to prove our right to be here, since no one can tell who is a citizen just by looking at them (btw, I’m white-skinned and my ancestors are from Europe). The recent case in the Midwest where an American citizen of Puerto Rican descent was imprisoned for three days even AFTER he produced his birth certificate is horrifying. Supporters of this bill keep denying that this will lead to racial profiling, but I and many others think they are very wrong. The connection with white supremacist groups (including FAIR, which helped to draft this bill, and is on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s list of hate groups), the disgusting comments you can see on the blogs and websites, the supporters who proudly identify themselves as Nazis (including Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who said it was a compliment), and the fact that this tactic mimics southern Jim Crow laws that were designed to prevent eligible U.S. citizens from voting—all of that screams to me that some people are afraid of those who are different from them and will do anything possible to keep them down. This is sad, and I hope that the good people of AZ and the nation will say “No. This is not who we are as a people.” I also hope that you will keep digging, Dylan, because as a reporter you can educate people. Thanks. lily

5
3 comments
May 31, 2010, 2:22 am
-1 +2

It’s high time to get a handle on illegal immigration. SB 1070 is not about race but the rule of law.
However we need to hear your opinion at //link removed//

Cast your vote - each comment counts.

6
3 comments
May 31, 2010, 8:53 am
-1 +1

@greattt, When laws are unjust, it is our obligation as Americans to resist them (we are not 1930s Germans “just obeying orders”). This law is racist because it is part of the plan of white supremacists (which includes eliminating classes where students learn about all people’s contributions to our country). Here’s a link that gives information about Russell Pearce, who is SB1070’s sponsor, and his connections with self-proclaimed neo-Nazis (with pictures). http://crooksandliars.com/david-neiwert/profiling-arizona-legislator-russell. There’s a lot more out there, if you look for it. I find him and his buddies quite scary, and they don’t represent me or most other Arizonans. Thanks for your comment. lily

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