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One month after SB 1070, change seen in Arizona

Opinion: One month ago, Gov. Jan Brewer signed the draconian bill SB 1070 into law, legalizing racial profiling. In that month, Arizona changed.... Read more»

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8 comments on this story

1
8 comments
May 27, 2010, 8:33 am
-2 +1

Is the US CODE UNCONSTITUTIONAL?

US CODE TITLE 8 > CHAPTER 12 > SUBCHAPTER II > Part VIII > § 1325

§ 1325. Improper entry by alien

TITLE 8 > CHAPTER 12 > SUBCHAPTER II > Part VIII > § 1324a

§ 1324a. Unlawful employment of aliens

WE DO NOT NEED IMMIGRATION REFORM.  WE NEED IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT.

ENFORCE THE LAW


We should treat immigrants like Mexico does:

At present, Article 67 of Mexico’s Population Law says, “Authorities, whether federal, state or municipal ... are required to demand that foreigners prove their legal presence in the country, before attending to any issues.”

That would simplify things.


Operation Wet_back was a 1954 operation by the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) to remove about one million illegal immigrants from the southwestern United States, focusing on Mexican nationals.

Simple question:

What happens if someone jumps the fence and wanders around a gated community without an ID and a resident of the community calls the cops saying someone that doesn’t look like they belong here is roaming the streets?  The cops arrive. They would ask the wanderer a few questions.  If wanderer does not have a valid reason for being inside the gated community, the cops would escort them out, wouldn’t they? Isn’t a country, like the USA, a “gated community”, too?

2
1 comments
May 27, 2010, 9:02 am
-0 +1

Thank you David! So eloquent and strong and informed. We are not a hateful, racist people who condemn our neighbors.  Change is coming to Arizona!

3
3 comments
May 27, 2010, 2:19 pm
-2 +1

Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, even if it is informed by sensationalized media, but be aware that the people that do actually read into the bills to which you refer likely have very different views.

Re “There is also an attempt to ban English teachers with an accent”:  True, but in ESL classrooms, where the point is to learn the language of the country you now live in.  Completely understandable.

Re 1070:  What is written in this state law is federal law.  Any Arizona police officer would be given the same right as Customs and Border Patrol to detain someone here in the US illegally.  Don’t see anyone up in arms over the federal law, do we?  Yes, many illegal immigrants in the southern US are from Mexico, but there are also people who were here legally but overstayed their visas.  Anyone worried about carrying papers on them needs only to carry their driver’s license, just as you should be doing at all times when driving.  Said papers were needed to issue the driver’s license, which can be confirmed by the computer located in the police officer’s car.

For someone who is a Latino, why don’t you consider the immigration laws in Mexico before you start attacking those in the US?  Among other things, illegal immigrants can be detained indefinitely by the corrupt police force.  “[The Mexican law] is an interesting law—and one that should cause us all to ask, Why is our great southern neighbor pushing us to water down our own immigration laws and policies, when its own immigration restrictions are the toughest on the continent? If a felony is a crime punishable by more than one year in prison, then Mexican law makes it a felony to be an illegal alien in Mexico… If the United States adopted such statutes, Mexico no doubt would denounce it as a manifestation of American racism and bigotry.”  Jose Calderon is a prime example of the pot calling the kettle black, now isn’t he?

For more:  http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=14632 (Published in 2006).

Huh.  Makes you think now doesn’t it?

4
3 comments
May 27, 2010, 3:02 pm
-0 +0

Before I get reamed for getting the president of Mexico’s name wrong, Felipe Calderon.

5
3 comments
May 27, 2010, 3:15 pm
-0 +1

mariposa reported:

Re “There is also an attempt to ban English teachers with an accent”:  True, but in ESL classrooms, where the point is to learn the language of the country you now live in.  Completely understandable.

Discrimination is not, nor will it ever be “understandable.”

For someone who is a Latino, why don’t you consider the immigration laws in Mexico before you start attacking those in the US?  Among other things, illegal immigrants can be detained indefinitely by the corrupt police force.

This is not Mexico, nor should it be. We have our own immigration laws for a reason. It’s like you’re saying “It’s not fair! Mexico gets to be harsh to their immigrants, why can’t we?” That sounds really infantile to me. The United States is a wonderful nation BECAUSE of our immigration and the diverse people we have here. Look at Mexico, and ask yourself how much you really want to be like that. Mexico’s immigration laws are not justification for enacting laws like SB1070. In fact, we should be doing everything in our power to be the opposite of Mexico. Why the crap do you think so many people are trying to come here? Essentially, you want to make this country a craphole so no one comes here. That’s a bad idea.

6
3 comments
May 27, 2010, 3:23 pm
-0 +1

TheRumpledOne opined:

Simple question:
What happens if someone jumps the fence and wanders around a gated community without an ID and a resident of the community calls the cops saying someone that doesn’t look like they belong here is roaming the streets?  The cops arrive. They would ask the wanderer a few questions.  If wanderer does not have a valid reason for being inside the gated community, the cops would escort them out, wouldn’t they? Isn’t a country, like the USA, a “gated community”, too?

It’s only like a gated community if you’re afraid of the outside world. We’re all humans, no matter what we look like and no matter what imaginary lines we draw to divide ourselves.

7
3 comments
May 27, 2010, 4:28 pm
-1 +0

katohater - Why not consider this:  During the 8 years that I took Spanish classes (HS through university level), I only ever had native Spanish-speaking teachers.  Because they were natives, I learned how to mimic their accent(s) and can comprehend spoken Spanish very well.  It is my 2nd language, so it’s a bit harder to speak it in response, but my comprehension is impeccable.  Why shouldn’t kids in ESL classes be allowed the same privilege by being taught by native English-speakers?

What you and a lot of people against SB1070 don’t understand is that it’s already a FEDERAL law.  Currently, federal agencies, i.e. Customs and Border Patrol, are the only ones that can question immigration status.  Illegal immigrants just keep returning to the US after being sent across the border for infractions.  Speeding, car accidents, other offenses for which I would be held accountable, there is no way to enforce the laws that already stand and hold someone who is an illegal immigrant accountable and under scrutiny when they can simply up and leave for the next town over with no record of them existing on the books.  Of course people should be able to come here, but legally.  I’m required to have a passport and visa to travel to foreign countries, and I’m expected to play by the rules of the countries I visit.

For Calderon to cry foul when his immigration laws are much harsher is completely bogus, like “Keep my nationals in your country illegally and don’t punish them, but if one of your nationals illegally crosses the border to my country, I get to lock them away for a felony”.  Seems like laws are only p.c. if it makes the grass greener for Calderon’s people on the other side of the “imaginary line”.  He’s clearly “afraid of the outside world”.  Why can’t the Arizona or US government have those same views?

The US is a wonderful place because of immigration, yes, but I feel that my great-grandfather’s hard work saving up money to afford passage by boat to Ellis Island is cheapened by people who are here illegally.  He saved up enough money for himself and his future wife, and had money to get on his feet after getting to the US.  Now, the way to get into this country legally is to have some desired work skill, something that makes you an asset.  How is that not fair in a nation with God-only-knows-how-much debt where there are millions of people already on welfare and food stamps?

8
3 comments
May 28, 2010, 9:53 am
-0 +1

mariposa asserted:

Why shouldn’t kids in ESL classes be allowed the same privilege by being taught by native English-speakers?

Was there a law that stated only native Spanish speakers could teach Spanish? The situation didn’t require that the Spanish teacher have a native accent to be an effective Spanish teacher, but it was helpful. In the same way, an ESL teacher doesn’t have to have an English accent to be an effective English teacher. Maybe we should make it a law that only British people can teach English here. That would be a right kerfuffle!

Of course people should be able to come here, but legally.  I’m required to have a passport and visa to travel to foreign countries, and I’m expected to play by the rules of the countries I visit.

So why is it that you aren’t living in the countries where immigrants are expected to play by the rules? If you value that form of immigration enforcement, what makes the U.S. the place to be? I’m not telling you to leave, mind you. I’m asking what makes the U.S. so great, if we can’t even get our immigration policies in order? Is it because we value freedom above immigration laws? Is it because freedom includes not showing your citizenship identification wherever you go, and that you aren’t considered a suspect because you look different. Along with this freedom come some unfortunate problems like what we are seeing right now. The solution is to find out how to remain free while tackling these issues, it is not to become like the countries that don’t value freedom in the highest regard.

For Calderon to cry foul when his immigration laws are much harsher is completely bogus, like “Keep my nationals in your country illegally and don’t punish them, but if one of your nationals illegally crosses the border to my country, I get to lock them away for a felony”.  Seems like laws are only p.c. if it makes the grass greener for Calderon’s people on the other side of the “imaginary line”.  He’s clearly “afraid of the outside world”.  Why can’t the Arizona or US government have those same views?

As I said above, we can’t have those same views because we aren’t aspiring to be Mexico or any other country. We aspire to remain the land of the free, and that means whatever Calderon says doesn’t mean squat. What WE say and do is what matters.

The US is a wonderful place because of immigration, yes, but I feel that my great-grandfather’s hard work saving up money to afford passage by boat to Ellis Island is cheapened by people who are here illegally.  He saved up enough money for himself and his future wife, and had money to get on his feet after getting to the US.  Now, the way to get into this country legally is to have some desired work skill, something that makes you an asset.  How is that not fair in a nation with God-only-knows-how-much debt where there are millions of people already on welfare and food stamps?

What your great-grandfather did was very admirable. What the immigrants do today, does not cheapen anything. This situation is far different. Do you really think people would risk crossing a massive desert if they had another option? Let’s see, fill out some papers and pay a fee or walk hundreds of miles through scorched desolation. I really doubt the choice is that simple. Perhaps the wait time is too long or perhaps the fee is too great. I don’t really know. But for people to risk their lives like that speaks volumes to me.

It’s interesting you mentioned Ellis Island. The inscription on the Statue of Liberty does not read: “Give me your strong, your rich, and those who have some desired work skill.” No, it does not say that at all.

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