McCain treated for torn Achilles tendon
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McCain treated for torn Achilles tendon

Even as he continues to be a thorn in the side of the Trump administration, Sen. John McCain has problems with his heel: he was treated over the weekend for a torn Achilles tendon.

The Arizona Republican will wear a walking boot on his right foot "until his injured tendon is fully healed," a statement from his office said.

McCain was treated at Walter Reed Medical Center for the "minor tear ... as well as for other normal and non-life-threatening side effects of cancer therapy," his office said.

The six-term senator was diagnosed in July with an aggressive, often deadly brain cancer: glioblastoma. He had a two-inch clot removed during a craniotomy.

That form of cancer is the most aggressive type that begins in the brain, with early symptoms that may include personality changes, headaches, and symptoms similar to those of a stroke.

Glioblastomas generally recur, despite surgery and cancer treatments, and most patients live 12-15 months after diagnosis. Less than 3-5 percent live longer than five years, with those patients who are not treated dying within three months.

Glioblastoma is the same variety of cancer that killed Sen. Ted Kennedy, D-Mass., in 2009. Kennedy was diagnosed in 2008 after a seizure.

McCain has had less-aggressive cancers before. McCain had surgery to remove Stage IIa melanoma in 2000, including removing the lymph nodes on the left side of his neck. He has had four operations to remove skin cancers since 1993, and at least one non-cancerous mole removed as a precaution, in 2008.

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Joel T. Vernile/Cronkite News

Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, acknowledges the applause of U.S. Naval Academy midshipmen, whom he praised last week for their service and called on to defend American values.