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'Cause of my life' - Giffords rebrands gun-control group with her name

Gabrielle Giffords is a woman of few words, but the name of the formerly voluble lawmaker speaks volumes. Tuesday, the gun-control advocacy group she founded after surviving an assassination attempt was rebranded, and now simply bears her last name.

"Addressing a problem that almost took my life will be the cause of my life," the former congresswoman said in a news release.

Americans for Responsible Solutions, started by Giffords and her husband, ex-astronaut Mark Kelly, in the wake of the Jan. 8, 2011, attack that killed six and wounded a 13 in Tucson, and an associated legal group, the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, founded in 1993, have merged and are now known as "Giffords."

The group will augment the lobbying efforts of the newly dubbed Giffords PAC with the research and courtroom advocacy of what's now known as the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence.

"I've seen great courage when my life was on the line. But I've also seen great courage as we've fought to save lives from gun violence. Every day I meet brave Americans who are standing with me in the fight for a safer future," Giffords said.

Kelly and Giffords released a video touting the group's new name that features former President Barack Obama, U.S. Sen. Patrick Toomey (R-Pa.) and retired Gen. Stanley McChrystal, who formerly commanded the Joint Special Operations Command.

"Enough is enough," Giffords said.

"We're so lucky we still have Gabby with us, but we take up this cause for every American who's not as lucky — for the hundreds of thousand who lost loved ones to gun violence, who had to learn with a disability, who had ot bury their own children," Obama said.

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"People say we can never take the guns out of society completely," McChrystal said "Well, I don't think many people are calling for that. I think what we're calling for is the kinds of things that bring sanity back."

"When people think of Gabby, they think of courage, determination, and grit — and it's exactly those characteristics Americans need to channel in order for us to save lives from gun violence and make our communities safer," said Kelly, a former Navy pilot and NASA astronaut who founded the group with Giffords after 20 schoolchildren were murdered in Newtown, Conn.

Giffords was shot in the head at point-blank range by a gunman during a 2011 meeting with constituents. Her ability to speak as fluently as before is gone, but she remains very engaged with public issues.

"When Gabby and I began this journey, we knew this wouldn't be an easy fight," Kelly said. "The gun lobby has been selling a message of fear to the American public for years. It's used its money to scare lawmakers into following its extreme ideology — and it's made talking about guns culturally divisive, despite the fact that the majority of gun owners support stronger gun laws. A safer America requires changing that dynamic. We need more people to show the courage to stand up for what's right and we need more elected officials to show the courage to take action."

Giffords and Kelly have said they both own firearms.

Before the rebranding, the group had already "played a role in passing over 200 new, stronger gun laws in 45 states and Washington, D.C.," said Peter Ambler, Giffords' executive director.

"For 24 years, the Law Center's attorneys have developed lifesaving gun safety legislation, successfully defended smart gun laws in the courts, and educated the public on the proven solutions to this devastating—and uniquely American—epidemic," said Robyn Thomas, of the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence.

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Giffords joined other survivors of the Jan. 8 attack in a 2013 return to the scene of shooting, calling for stronger background check laws.

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