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How Arizona farmers cope with a closed border

With winter lettuce season starting in November, Arizona farms are rushing to find workers for harvest. A difficult task, made more difficult with the anti-immigration rhetoric coming from the current administration.... Read more»

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Hunger persists in Cochise County

Hunger gnaws at Cochise County citizens more than for average Americans.... Read more»1

Gaps in Clery Act figures create appearance of safe colleges

The number of sexual assaults against University of Arizona women is five times greater than what the university reports to federal authorities as required by law.... Read more»

Arizona public records aren’t so public

More than a month ago, 19 Arizona agencies were given simple public record requests seeking data on the numbers of those requests those agencies received in 2015 and 2016. Less than half responded. ... Read more»

Legislative roundup: Pets and bill signings

Last week was the first week where legislators didn’t meet for committee hearings. Instead, their time was devoted to dozens of votes in the House and Senate and watching the governor’s pen for new laws all before working through the budget in the coming weeks.... Read more»

Legislative roundup: A retired justice, minimum wage & drunken hair cuts

The week in the Arizona Legislature.... Read more»

'Witchcraft' becoming more popular among young Latinos

To say the word “brujo” in some communities is akin to yelling “fire!” in a crowded movie theater. It incites fear and panic. Now, more and more younger Latinos are identifying as brujos and claiming to practice brujería, much to the bewilderment of others who grew up in fear of it.... Read more»

Many Arizona students underprepared for college

Are Arizona students prepared for college? Recent data indicates they're not. Students here lag the national average in all categories: English, reading, math and science. Only 23 percent of Arizona students meet the benchmarks in all four subjects.... Read more»

Legislative roundup: More guns and some not so nice things

By mid-day in the beginning of March, it’s already too warm to spend much time outside in Phoenix, but you wouldn’t know that at the state Legislature. Senators, representatives, interns and pages are all working from 9 a.m. to well into the evening, blocking off most of the sun-lit hours. Gov. Doug Ducey has finally started signing bills into law, and the late-night marathon sessions have given legislators dozens of bills to read every day.... Read more»

Arizonans ask for regulation rollbacks on taxes, water use, hot dogs

Gov. Doug Ducey’s hotline for red-tape tips is gathering more boiling mad complaints than concrete suggestions.... Read more»

Legislative roundup: Cell phones and tampon tax

On Valentine’s Day, the Arizona State Capitol was full of gratuitous shows of love: singing on the House floor, heart-shaped balloons on the rose garden. But whether state minimum wage workers will feel the love became the question. Meanwhile, legislators reviewed bills on tax returns, sales taxes on tampons, teen drivers and more.... Read more»

El Jefe: Jaguar missing in action?

El Jefe, Tucson’s lone male jaguar, caught the attention of Arizonans while residing in a tree in Southeastern Arizona. But it’s been a year since trail cameras caught footage of the wandering jaguar.... Read more»

Legislative roundup: Tanning, guns, tuition costs

This was the busiest week yet this session for Arizona lawmakers, with committee hearings taking hours and bills vetted by the dozens. The week on the capitol began graced with dozens of Arizona firefighters spotting the mall, and ended with a farmers market. Somewhere in between, a mini horse trotted across the Rose Garden to lobby for service animals.... Read more»

Arizona police might not enforce Trump’s immigration orders

Arizona law enforcement mostly say they won’t participate in widespread immigration raids that target long-term undocumented immigrants no matter what President Trump’s new executive order says. Phoenix, Tucson and Nogales police, and Yuma, Santa Cruz and Maricopa sheriffs say officers will not target those who have no violent felony offenses.... Read more»

Tucson felons set aside their past with rights restoration clinics

Felons with multiple convictions cannot vote, run for public office, sit on a jury or possess a firearm. They must have these rights restored via what is called a judicial “set aside.” In general, the set aside is an important step for former prisoners to return to a “normal” life. ... Read more»

Cochise County economy lags as Ft. Huachuca jobs plunge

Fort Huachuca, the U.S. Army base that has been at the center of the Cochise County’s life since frontier days, has seen its work force drastically cut over the past decade, resulting in an economic downturn in the area.... Read more»

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