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Let's get into trouble

A weekend of musical trips

Whether you want to travel into the psychedelic recesses of your mind or just cruise southward to catch some blues, we've got you covered.

I don’t know what to believe

Local quartet Wight Lhite is a bit hard to pigeonhole, a characteristic that always deserves praise. The band has loose ties to the psychedelic/garage sound currently among the most prevalent of indie rock styles, and arguably the sub-genre that has defined Tucson’s underground community for most of the decade thus far. But five years is long time in subterranean rock ‘n’ roll music, and the connection between Wight Lhite’s output and the speed-fueled primitivism of, say, The Resonars — a major influence on Southwest and West Coast garage in the last several years — is pretty much non-existent.

Wight Lhite — whose relationship with The Velvet Underground album their name presumably references — is continuing on a trail blazed by British contemporaries of The Resonars, such as Spacemen 3 or The Verve. Which is to say, they value length over form and explorations of consciousness over pop hooks. This is music to invest time in, in order to reap its formidable rewards. Their 2014 album “Beyond the Satellites” successfully demonstrated this along with their live appearances, which will see them at 191 Toole at 8p.m. Friday, along with Islands & Tigers and Lonely Hunting. Admission is $5.

Counting diamonds

You know what you need? You need to get out of town for a night and see more of the world. And while Southeastern Arizona's hamlet of Elgin might not be the best place to see more of the world, it does count as getting out of town and will be the location of the 4th Annual Southeast Arizona Wine Growers and Music Festival. The music slots will be filled by The AmoSphere and Tom Fetter and The Usual Suspects, two like-minded local groups who perform a mix of original and cover material, typically adhering to blues-rock and Boomer-friendly world music styles such as reggae and New Orleans R&B. While the grups can be frequently found at Fourth Avenue spots like The Hut, the juxtaposition of lots of wine and an unusual location should enhance the appeal of their already ingratiating music.

The festival will take place at the Kief-Joshua Vineyards on 370 Elgin Rd., Saturday from 11a.m.-5p.m. A visit to Google Maps probably wouldn’t hurt before the trip.

Close to odd

Rapper Big Meridox, whose “7th Division” EP was my favorite release of any genre last year, hosts a hip-hop showcase night every couple of months called “While You Slept.” And it’s an appropriate title — I’ve been to several of these and the audience attendance was sorely lacking, especially in the presence of such major talent. Don’t sleep on it this week because one of the featured performers in Tucson’s most disarming emcee, Shaun Harris.

Harris’ greatest strength is subverting nearly every aspect of post-gangsta hip-hop, in both persona and in style. Harris’ eye for detail, humor and considerable smarts leaves his ordinary-guy stance extraordinary. His considered lack of star power keeps his material grounded and is the key to his excellence: his lyrics might be easy to relate to, but his observations are, at their very best, revelatory.

Shaun Harris performs with Kings Over Squares and Boom Box Bros & Maven at The Flycatcher, 340 E. Sixth St., 8 p.m. Saturday. Five dollars will get you in the door.

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Nicci Radhe via facebook.com/wightlhite

Wight Lhite performing on KXCI's 'Locals Only.'

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With this new column, named after Tucson's decades-old and defunct local music public access television show "Let's Get Into Trouble, Baby," TucsonSentinel.com is your solid source for serious coverage of our weird and wonderful homegrown monster of a music scene.